A small primer on vacuum fluctuations

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by SimonsCat, Jan 21, 2017.

  1. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    No of course it doesn't mention zero Kelvin - that's not the focus of the article. Any textbook on solid-state physics will back what I claimed. And of course the table figures have a factor of 10^4 to be applied. Don't tell me you think the 'real' Fermi temperatures should be 'corrected' by a factor of 10^-4?! Err, no. For example, Lithium as first entry there has a Fermi temp of 5.51 x 10^4 K. Yep, believe it or not. And that 'temperature' is there would be present even at absolute zero. Does that baffle you? Probably.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
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  3. SimonsCat Registered Member

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    There is no absolute zero!! How many times does this need to be explained, a system never reaches zero kelvin, because of the temperature still present at the ground state.
     
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  5. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    So I have to think like a lawyer when answering you - see my slight and unnecessary edit in #21.
     
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  7. SimonsCat Registered Member

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    When you talk about zero kelvin, you absolutely mean zero kelvin (?), you don't seem to be referring to residual motion fields, like a zero point field?

    Either way, temperature exists at the ground state (because it is not absent) of vacuum fluctuations, or residual motion of the field. In other words, zero kelvin doesn't exist. No system has ever been in a state of zero kelvin and never will be at zero kelvin.
     
  8. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    Sigh. Sigh.
     
  9. SimonsCat Registered Member

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    yes learning is hard work, I understand your sighs.
     

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