all roads lead to rome

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by birch, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. birch Valued Senior Member

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    what are all the possible meanings of this phrase?

    if a metaphor, what does or can it apply to?

    also, is it neutral or has it been used with positive or negative connotations?
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2011
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  3. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Deleted a couple of nonsense posts and moved thread to "Linguistics".
     
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  5. birch Valued Senior Member

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    does this phrase imply lack of choice?

    positively, one could interpret this like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow but

    to me rome signifies an overriding power, was this phrase originally used negatively to refer to rome's power over others resulting in lack of choice?

    was this phrase originally meant as good or bad? and how is it commonly used today?
     
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  7. chimpkin C'mon, get happy! Registered Senior Member

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    The Romans built a lot of roads, the purpose of which was efficient troop movement, if I recall. So the really nice roads were straight, paved, elevated, and went to Rome.

    I think it is used to say "There are different means to arrive at the same end."
     
  8. Varda The Bug Lady Valued Senior Member

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    Nonsense...

    As I was saying, I like the phrase to mean that everything leads to evil. It's the bhuddist approach. The ultimate goal is to releave yourself of all needs, to avoid evil.

    I think it's most commonly used to say that a certain place is in fashion, or buzzing. The center of the world. All roads did use to lead to rome.

    Enmos, your judgement is turning into shit. Beig a mod is eating at your brain.
     
  9. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Ok, I apologize then. Since I was moving it to Linguistics I wanted to move it there cleaned of any "Free Thoughts-content". If you know what I mean.
    By the way, you didn't have to get hysterical. You could have just PM-ed me and explained to me why I was in error.
     
  10. Pinwheel Banned Banned

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    Wheres the fun in that. Angry Varda = much entertainment.
     
  11. Varda The Bug Lady Valued Senior Member

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    I make all my opinions public. None of that shady PM laundry business with me.
    You can tell that to jamesr.

    Besides, im not hysterical, or angry. I am just giving you a sense of consequence to reckless moding.
    I want you to think a little before you delete shit I took the time to write. Is that too much to ask?
     
  12. Varda The Bug Lady Valued Senior Member

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    Btw apology accepted.
     
  13. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    Not those in South America used by the Incas and Mayans. The Aboriginies of Austraila had some sort of roads too.
     
  14. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

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    No.


    No.


    Good.


    Similarly as "all paths lead to the top of the mountain".
     
  15. nietzschefan Thread Killer Valued Senior Member

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    Two things:

    1. Roman roads were in fact quite something.

    2. For a Long period of time in Rome was Essentially the capital of the western world.
     
  16. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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  17. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    The American Heritage Dictionary says that this idiom was in use in the 12th century--long before our language, Modern English, had evolved. It has been stated in many ways: "A thousand roads lead man forever towards Rome." (translated from Middle English)--Chaucer 1391; "All roads alike conduct to Rome."--R. Thomson 1806.

    The sources I find unanimously agree that the meaning of this aphorism is that there are multiple ways to achieve a goal.

    They also agree that it grew out of the fact that the fifty thousand miles of paved roads built by the legendary Roman engineers did indeed radiate out of their capital city. They were originally built for use of their military forces in conquering Europe, but as that goal was achieved, they were used for peaceful purposes such as commerce. It's been said that the Empire was so well administered and so thoroughly policed that traders could travel long distances with their wares and their money, without personal guards, and not worry about being robbed.
     
  18. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    Interesting. I always get hung up on figures of speech, colloquialisms, and suchlike--it's probably an autistic thing. Point being, I overlook the obvious and most commonplace connotation, and rather think along the lines of the political (see my post above yours).
     
  19. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

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    That was interesting . Something about that sound I been thinking for a while . That cut rhythm with transposed over that slow methodical vocals. Yeah Me brain thinks that way naturally . I have not put my finger on it . It would be like playing 3 or 4 songs with different rhythms at discourse with each other but resolving at the root on the turn around or every other turn around. Like the mind thinking in 16th notes but another movement over the top thinking in whole notes as simplified example . Me friend Jane had a song and she said it was her favorite . Hill billy in its natural analysis. It was really jumbled up . Then realized it was 4 songs she had married together . It gave it a sound like tripping or skipping. Very good for a trained ear as Jane had pobably the most well trained ear I have ever seen and the funny thing is she is a listener and not a player . Fuck she could pick out a flat 9 or a sus 4 and state it so with out hesitation . Truly amazing for an appreciator.

    O.K. off track . I like top of the Mountain thing . Greathouse Peak comes to my selfish little mind . The Fossils at the top of the mountain also come to bigger mind . O.K. if we think of history as link to the past and all roads lead from the past to present . You get my drift . The future extends from the past . This is in respect to the information highway . The learning curve so to speak
     
  20. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah, I kind of think like that musically as well--that is to say, I'm very much a visual thinker but work best in the sonic medium. I can naturally, and obliviously, play both polyrhythms and crossrhytyhms. It's rare that I find a drummer with whom I can "gel" in that respect, but I've known a few.
     
  21. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Your band should probably have two percussionists.
     
  22. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah, but then I would have to divide that massive three figure take from a gig between even more people.

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    My previous main project was a trio (drum, guitar, organ--and I often handled the bass parts on the organ) and my drummer could intuitively play cross-rhythmically against the rest of the rhythm section (me, that is). And she often wasn't even aware that that was what she was doing. In another project (a large ensemble with six to eight members, including organ, double bass, bassoon, and accordion) I worked with a drummer who could play in four time poly-rhythmically to a passage that the rest of us were playing in 17/8. That always blew me away.

    Nowadays I mostly work solo (primary instruments being pedal harmonium, various self-designed electronics, and sundry percussion) and occasionally use a radically modified ancient drum machine: the SoundMaster SR-88, which was a virtual clone of the Roland/Boss DR-55 marketed in 1980. I create the poly-rhythms with a simple overlay of delay loops.

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  23. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    I prefer Pratchett's more cognizant and valuable translation: "All roads lead away from Rome."

    And yes, that's a good thing.
     

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