Anthony Bourdain dead at 61 - Suicide

Discussion in 'World Events' started by Kittamaru, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. Kittamaru Never cruel nor cowardly... Staff Member

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    13,806
    http://www.kbzk.com/story/38379046/cnns-anthony-bourdain-dead-at-61

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5821039/Anthony-Bourdain-died-suicide-age-61.html

    To anyone out there who is suffering depression, or even just feeling down and out... you are not alone. There is help, and you can overcome this; don't take a permanent "solution" to a temporary problem.

    US Suicide prevention hotline : 1-800-273-8255

    For non-US members - http://ibpf.org/resource/list-international-suicide-hotlines
     
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  3. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    I was recently wishing he would disappear. Strange.
     
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  5. pjdude1219 screw watergate i want to know about zaragate Valued Senior Member

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    seriously not appropriate. a mans dead like him or not at least let the body be cold before you start trashing him.
     
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  7. Kittamaru Never cruel nor cowardly... Staff Member

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    Might I ask two things here...

    1) What is your particular reasoning for wishing this?

    2) What compels one to think it appropriate to seemingly cheer yet another in a long list of suicides?
     
  8. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    I'm not cheering. I sympathize with his depression. I just had an irrational dislike for a man that takes vacations for a living. I don't get why he was popular and such a media figure. Why does he get a black box and headlines on CNN when many recently deceased people that I greatly admired are relegated to a generic "who we lost in 2018" page?
     
  9. CptBork Robbing the Shalebridge Cradle Valued Senior Member

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    5,712
    Bourdain did something ordinary people can relate to and appreciate. I find among the general population, even among friends with a science background, I get a lot more praise and recognition for my cheesecakes, steak sandwiches and just about anything else I make in the kitchen, than I ever did for discussing issues in science or solving equations, and I can understand why normal everyday people would feel this way. Good thing my science background makes me a better cook!

    It's just too bad Mr. Bourdain couldn't stick around and continue showing people how to relax and enjoy their lives. With his personal background as both a renowned, talented chef and a recovering drug addict, he was a role model for a lot of people looking to get their broken lives back on track. It doesn't leave much hope for the folks he inspired when it all ends like this, kind of like what happened with Robin Williams- it's the kind of story that deserved a happy ending, or at least a couple more decades of life before calling it quits.
     
  10. Kittamaru Never cruel nor cowardly... Staff Member

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    13,806
    Except he doesn't "take vacations for a living" - there is actually a lot that goes on behind the scenes to make a show such as his happen; he also worked hard to try and paint as truthful a picture of the various cultures he visited as he could. Yes, he got to travel and see the world and eat fantastic food for his career - but he fought hard to get there to reap those rewards, and he worked hard to continue doing so; in many ways, I'd say he worked harder than many Fortune 500 CEO's that are rich simply because they are the "top of the ladder".
     
  11. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    13,956
    Is that a joke? That's like claiming a brewer drinks for a living, or that a salesman that travels a lot just takes vacations for a living.
    Because he had a popular show that was watched by millions, and that employed hundreds of people directly and thousands indirectly.
     
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  12. Neddy Bate Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,596
    I had only recently learned of his existence. Late at light, I sometimes drive past a Waffle House that is always open, and seems to have quite a few customers for such a late hour. I had never been to a Waffle House, so before trying it out for the first time, I decided to do some searching online. I came across this video, which was the first time I saw him:



    Unfortunately the sound is rather soft and tinny, like an old AM radio. I had to adjust the volume to hear it better. But the Waffle House earned my respect from this video. May he rest in peace.
     
  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,051
    Perhaps because, just like you are doing here, the vast majority of people see him only as a media celebrity, and not as a troubled human being with a real life, including demons he can't shake off?
     
  14. Bells Staff Member

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    22,672
    But that wasn't what he actually did.

    He traveled to war zones, third world countries and areas people would never think or dare to visit, not just to bring focus to their way of life, but most importantly to focus on how and what they ate. He also focused on poverty, pain, horror and how people eek out a living, sometimes with very little to eat or drink.

    By doing so, he also employed a lot of people and ensured that the restaurants, eateries and street vendors he visited, received attention they would not normally receive. The knock-on effect was an increase in interest in those cultures and foods, meaning in countries like the US and the UK, for example, would see an uptick in eateries from those countries and cultures and international supermarkets in those countries selling more products from other countries and the knock-on effect from that is even greater employment.

    I mean, would you say the same for travel writers, for example?

    He could have stayed home and just kept writing more and more cooking books. He chose to get out there, and see how people lived and ate, and brought those cultures and people into the living rooms of people who do not notice or know or recognise how other cultures live.

    I think putting it down to he just took vacations for a living ignores the extensive work that goes into producing these shows.

    Because he was not out there "discovering" new countries and cuisines, but out there experiencing it.

    He went there to gain a greater understanding. In doing so, he also highlighted how other people lived. He was also there to learn. Not to appropriate it, but to learn and he did so by respecting the cultures of the countries he visited.

    He also used his platform to highlight issues that many would ignore. For example, when the #MeToo stories broke about the film industry, he used his platform to highlight the toxic masculinity that exists within the food industry. He did so by looking at his own behaviour, through introspection.

    Because he was who he was and did what he did and his death has left many around the globe, devastated. In a week's time, he too will be relegated to the "who we lost in 2018" page.
     
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  15. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    I apologize, apparently he was well respected, I didn't know anything about him.
     
  16. Watcher Just another old creaker Registered Senior Member

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    There are very few celebrities I have much respect for - he was one of them. Most are phonies. Seemed to me that Bourdain was genuine most of the time. He also seemed intelligent, and unfortunately it is often the intelligent ones that decide on suicide. Maybe it's because they can see the road ahead more clearly than others.
     
  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,051
    IMO, our like and dislike of celebrities - phony or otherwise - is a far cry from approving of their deaths.
    I mean nobody really thinks they're literally a 2D caricature we see - and nothing more - right? They have a mom, a dad, people that care about them, hopes, fears, etc.

    Our world famous crack-smoking mayor was quite vehemently hated by us rational people. Then he got cancer and died. That really put things in perspective. "Hate" pales when actual Death shows up.
     
  18. Michael 345 Looking for Bali in Nov Valued Senior Member

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    5,958
    From my medical outlook I see it as tragic any person takes there own life
    Exception - suffering physical pain

    I understand mental pain can be crippling but treatment more effective
    Also hard but not impossible for suffers to check for treatment

    My odd brain finds weirdness in the ways suicide committed

    Hanging???

    Surely large dose sleeping medication and strong alcohol of choice

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  19. Hayden Registered Senior Member

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    110
    This is a serious issue.
    Someone should develop AI based on face reading of subject concluding about the depression and possible suicide scare.

    I saw his pics all over the net, the guy was looking depressed even with some trophy in hand.

    The facial expressions surely will give the early warnings of suicide in such cases.
     
  20. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

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    18,237
    Perhaps he was a man who saw the tragic way the world is currently heading.
    Perhaps his despair for the future that he was trying so hard to improve and his sheer humanity overwhelmed any desire to hang around to witness it.
    Perhaps his sense of reality was too strong and his personal realizations ignored for too long.
    Perhaps he hoped that his death may serve to wake others up before it is too late.
    RIP.
     

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