Blue canvas with white line sells for $44 million..

Discussion in 'Art & Culture' started by Magical Realist, May 24, 2014.

  1. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,619
    Yeah i coud make a copy id be hapy wit for that amount... an if i didnt know what the original woud sell for i woudnt pay over $300 bucks for it.!!!
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    I think my rule of shopping and purchasing applies here. Before I buy anything, I consider very carefully if I actually need it or not, and then don't buy it anyway.

    Next time: my tips for shoplifters

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    Maybe you could do one on the side of your water tank.
    Then you wouldn't even need to buy wood.
    Decent paint, that's the key. $150 say, including brushes.
    You'd have to find out what technique he uses, to get the shade variations.
    It wouldn't be just a matter of painting a surface dark blue.
    I think he dabs it with something.
    Maybe a giant sponge on a stick.
    Sponge $5. You've probably got a stick.
    The white line wouldn't be a problem.
    Just put on some masking tape, $3, badly, then a few coats of brilliant white.
    Pull off the masking tape. Job done. $158 total.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. leopold Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    17,455
  8. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    You know, Onement VI looks rather like a section of road. So rather than your water tank, why not paint your driveway blue with the obligatory white line down the middle. It will be a fantastic icebreaker when the neighbors ask about it as you are washing the car. You can tell them it's a reproduction of a $44 million painting, and soon you'll be reclining on their front porch enjoying a free beer or cool lemonade, if that's your preference.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Never liked your neighbors? Can't be bothered to repaint your driveway? No problem. Next time you're going down a two-lane blacktop, with that solid white line just consider how it 'overwhelms and seduces the driver with the totality of its sensual, cascading washes of vibrant black coexisting withthe vertical “Sign” of the human presence, an iconic and revolutionary “zip.”

    Won't cost you a penny.
     
  9. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,251
    They are in process of doing that right now. It is going quite well, Arne, thanks.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    There are some real treasures here. The real estate market is very hot all over this area at the moment, new homes, replacements, complete rebuilds and the like are through the roof.

    Yes, there are places that a wise person does not go and there are things a wise person does not do. There are some very bad people here, some poor and some wealthy beyond belief. There are some really wonderful folks here as well, however. Also some really good stuff.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    Those classic Victorian, Greek Revival etc homes are in nice neighborhoods and have great potential for restoration. There are many area firms that do that kind of work.
     
  10. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    I meant no offense. Sorry, if it seemed a smart remark. I had no idea things were looking up in Detroit. I'm glad to hear it. It's an awful shame what happened to the Motor City. I think the Captain may have been being sarcastic, although I think he was being sincere in his query. The house he showed in his post is quite handsome, but I assumed it was in a bad neighborhood with nothing but other abandoned homes for half a mile or more around. The one next door seems in similar condition, and in most other cities you only ever see one derelict mansion at a time.
     
  11. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    It was a beautiful house. Still is, even though it is a ruin.
    Upsetting to see it in such condition.
    Who would have lived in houses like that Stoniphi?
    It would have been built before the car industries came.
    Late Victorian, I think.
    How many years ago would streets like that have looked prosperous?
     
  12. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,251
    Some still do, Capt, and the same Victorian homes line those blocks. I have been to several parties in areas like Indian Village populated with educated professionals who keep those homes up.

    Detroit had 3.5 million residents before the collapse of the auto industry, now it has about 750,000. Unfortunately, serious debt was racked up while the city was still packed with taxpayers. Several parties profited unduly from questionable deals. There is blame enough to spread around pretty much everywhere and more civilly responsible persons are repairing the situation now.

    There is antique infrastructure that has been cannibalized to keep other parts of the systems running. I lay all of the horseradish involved on both profit - hungry conspicuous - consumer capitalist power brokers and the big unions that let their power go to their heads. I have had problems with both of those myself through the years, am glad to see them both somewhat curbed, though it has cost me revenue as the economy tanked here.

    The old Packard plant that everyone in the world has seen portraying the abandoned decaying corpse of an industrial city in the center of the rust belt has been bought by a wealthy gentleman who is in process of a complete rebuild of the entire property. The first building will contain his residence.

    There are blocks of abandoned structures, in process of been torn down. Large sections of the city are bereft of structure, some of those large blocks of properties are being turned into orchards and forest. Sort of a re - ruralization downtown.

    This area has gone through many changes since the Euro - Americans settled here. Part of the interest it holds for me is the historic nature of my immediate surrounds and the small part that I have gotten to observe locally. Several railroad lines became rail - trails, the forests grew back, the iron foundry became a lumber yard, the sugar beet factory and pond became a car wash, 2 baseball fields, a basketball court and a pleasant expanse of green space park. The dam was taken down, the man - made lake drained away and became the city park with the river through the center. My dog and I go through there every day.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    That is a large part of what is going on here though. Not to say you can't find some nasty places, like I said, but those are pretty much everywhere and should all be addressed, IMHO.
     
  13. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    It is an opportunity. You need a good local council.
    Unfortunately in years gone by, when old buildings were torn down
    the emphasis was on building roads, for cars, and high rise offices and flats.
    Usually using concrete, building inferior buildings.
    Urban blight.
    Some towns in the UK are irretrievably ruined.

    Those Victorian mansions are too big for one family now.
    You could make four decent homes inside one, and leave the facade intact.
    (That one may be beyond repair)
    All people need are jobs.
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2014
  14. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,251
    Many of those old Victorian homes have been brought up to current building codes, altered for purpose and are now apartment buildings, group homes, retirement homes and the like. Some have been lost, as will others as we go on.

    We are in process of repurposing the whole area. The old Packard plant is an example. Packard went bankrupt and out of business many years ago and abandoned the building. It had no insulation, antique utilities and was very out-of-date. Now it will become shopping district, apartments, recreational facilities and the like - all things that we need now rather than a place for things we no longer need.

    If you want a 100% American made wrist watch or bicycle, it will come from Detroit as we are the only place in the country that makes those items now. Top notch cancer care is also in Detroit where the DaVinci robotic assisted surgery system was invented (they used that sukka on me), U of M is in the front lines on a ton of genetic research, driverless electric cars and a bunch of other cutting edge technology. As the big manufacturing plants have shut down and the uneducated hourly employees have either retired or left the state, research and development centers have moved in with degreed employees. Though fewer in number the folks coming here for work are more educated and earn more money than the hourly folks.

    Then there are individual contractors like myself. Some of the stuff I do is pretty exclusive - very few people on the planet do these things. If you want certain jobs done you will either end up with me or go to New York, London, Paris, Tokyo etc to get it done. I am in country and cheaper. I am just 1 of many extremely well educated career professionals who live here and won't be moving elsewhere.

    I must admit that the public image of Detroit tends to intimidate folks outstate, but a lot of that is decades ago now. It occasionally comes in handy though. I always wanted one of those T - shirts that say "Detroit, where the weak are killed and eaten"

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  15. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,738
    Do you have buildings like this in Detroit?
    I don't mean the buildings. They are old but serviceable.
    I mean the facade.
    This is Levenshulme, near Manchester, but the style is repeated in poor areas up and down the UK.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!




    Soul destroying.
    You couldn't parody it for awfulness.
    How could you have any energy and creativity in such a place?
    It should be illegal.
     
  16. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    Gee Captain, you make discount booze sound like a bad thing.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  17. spidergoat Liddle' Dick Tater Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    53,966
    What's so great about Maya Angelou? "I know why the caged bird sings"? I could write that in 2 seconds! I have the same letters on my keyboard!
     
  18. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    Um. remember my suggestion about reading other people's posts, and even more importantly your own - before posting? I think you're in the wrong thread, buddy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2014
  19. spidergoat Liddle' Dick Tater Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    53,966
    I was making a point about creativity. It doesn't matter if it appears to be simple, the fact is you didn't think of it, you didn't do it in the context in which it was received at the time. Much of modern art isn't a novel, it's a poem.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 29, 2014
  20. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,251
    ...and much of "modern art" is neither "modern" or "art".

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Gratefully, NMP.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  21. quinnsong Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,621
    I must admit I do like this painting of the red tee shirt but then again I love red and tee shirts so I am biased. On further analysis of this piece of art, I just really want that red tee shirt!
     
  22. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    The good news is you can buy them in shops now. Try 'Rothko's Red T-shirts', I'm sure there is an outlet at your nearest mall. Rothko's is like Starbuck's now, but without the over-rated coffee. How have you been, Quinn? Haven't been around much. Feel free to PM me, if there's anything you want to say that's not for general consumption. Cheers.
     
  23. Arne Saknussemm trying to figure it all out Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,353
    Returning to the OP. My take on modern art, semi-Philistine working stiff that I am, if you will deign to hear my opinion: I once had the time and money to spend a few day's at New York's Museum of Modern Art (I gave the admissions lady $7 even though she insisted it was free - so I am actually a patron of the fine arts in my own small way). Of course, there were all manner of paintings, sculptures and installations that floored me, but every time I was truly and totally wowed was at the hands of the master Pablo Picasso - and at first I hadn't even realized these works were Picasso's. Every time I looked at the information on the wall when I was absolutely amazed, there was his name! I remember one sketch (just a sketch!) of Pan that he had drawn, it was said, without ever lifting his pencil from the paper. Later I sat for half an hour admiring The Blind Man's Meal, a lump in my throat the whole time. The next day I did the same.

    I know that Picasso could draw like a pro from the time he was four years old, and have read that his father, also a painter, saw his young son's work and swore never to paint again in acknowledgement that his boy's talent was far superior to his own.

    As an grown man, and already famous artist, Pablo said something to the effect that he could draw well even as a child and that he had spent years teaching himself not to be able to draw and paint so well (I think he failed...).

    I don't know if we can consider Picasso's work as modern anymore, nearly a hundred years on. My point is that when an artist clearly does possess great talent, he has earned his 'poetic licence'. Only those who have mastered the rules can break them. So I suppose a great artist like Rothko can paint what ever and how ever he likes and his work can some day sell for $40 mil. However, that doesn't mean any clown can dab paint to canvas and we must acknowledge it as art. (Click on the painting to go to a Picasso Gallery)

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     

Share This Page