Bounce Light off Light?

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by John J. Bannan, Aug 5, 2008.

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  1. John J. Bannan Registered Senior Member

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    Well, you said, "Who said otherwise? We'll probably end up with an extremely dilute gas of photons and electrons---each particle will be out of causal contact with every other particle. If there is one photon for every billion light years, that sounds like a pretty good vacuum to me."
     
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  3. Reiku Banned Banned

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    Sorry. I mean, create matter that is of the standard model.
     
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  5. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Registered Senior Member

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    Except the vacuum will be a quantum vacuum so there's no 'truely empty' space.
     
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  7. BenTheMan Dr. of Physics, Prof. of Love Valued Senior Member

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    John---I was being sightly facetous, but what I said I think is still correct. There will probably also be quarks floating around, too.
     
  8. John J. Bannan Registered Senior Member

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    Is there any actual accepted answer to the question of what will be left over indefinitely as the universe expands indefinitely? Will it just be a quantum vacuum? Will it be just fundamental strings? Will it be just be photons? Will it be a mix of particles?
     
  9. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Registered Senior Member

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    It will be a mixture of various stable particles.
     
  10. CptBork Valued Senior Member

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    Because "fundamental" strings can be things other than photons. Just because non-photonic strings can decay into photonic strings, and some cosmological theories hold that all strings will eventually do this, that doesn't mean some strings are more "fundamental" than others. Clearly you're not equipped with the tools you need to understand physics terminology. Go get a textbook.
     
  11. John J. Bannan Registered Senior Member

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    Which particles are stable enough to last for eternity?
     
  12. AlphaNumeric Fully ionized Registered Senior Member

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    Neutrinos, photons, electrons and possibly the lightest supersymmetric particle, if R symmetry exists.
     
  13. Vern Registered Senior Member

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    Hi BenTheMan; I think you meant something else here; loose quarks, if they exist, are too unstable to even be observed.

    The idea that the universe is is a photon-only construct dates back to James Clerk Maxwell and there's still a bunch of us who see lots of evidence that it is such.
     
  14. BenTheMan Dr. of Physics, Prof. of Love Valued Senior Member

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    Well, I don't think the word is "unstable". But you're probably right.

    This is another thread.

    Either way, John has left, question is answered.
     
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