cortisol

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by sculptor, Jun 18, 2023.

  1. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,459
    is this accurate?:
    both low-carb and fasting are great interventions in the short-term for those who are overweight and metabolically inflexible, but when used chronically they can damage your metabolism and lead to health complications because they tend to cause chronic elevations in cortisol resulting in inflammation and catabolic lean muscle loss.

    So, if you don’t have enough glucose in your bloodstream, your body makes glucose by secreting cortisol, which breaks down your lean muscles, bones and brain to make amino acids that then convert to glucose in your liver. In one of his recent podcasts, Dinkov explained that the primary benefit of anabolic steroids is that they’re anti-cortisol. That's how anabolic steroids work to build muscle mass.

    Cortisol also uses up stored fat in a process called lipolysis. While this may sound like a great thing, the problem is that it doesn’t get rid of the harmful visceral fat...
    It burns your good fat, the peripheral and subcutaneous fat, which is useful.

    So, ultimately, chronic excess cortisol is going to cause inflammation and impair your immune function. It also increases food cravings. So, you do not want your cortisol to be elevated continuously in an effort to rescue you from hypoglycemia. Hence, a chronic low-carb diet is not a good idea for most people.
     
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  3. Pinball1970 Registered Senior Member

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    849
    Extreme diets do not work. If you are over weight and have always struggled with it the changes you must make will not be successful via a fad diet.
     
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  5. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,459
    agree
    however
    "Hence, a chronic low-carb diet is not a good idea for most people."
    need not preclude a short term keto diet?
     
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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    12,371
    Sounds broadly right, apart from the bit about bones and brain. It suppresses various synthetic processes in the body in order to prioritise availability of fuel for brain and muscle, but so far as I can see it does not break down bones or brain to do this.
     
  8. Pinball1970 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    849
    IT certainly works, I have done it. However, I was also doing the following.


    • Resistance training, splitting body parts to three sessions per week.
    • Aerobics, running and cycling
    • Badminton once per week.
    • Cut my carbs right down but not to keto levels (I tested regularly)
    • Supplements (protein)
    • No alcohol

    I went from 13 st 11 lbs to 12 st 6 in three months, increased muscle mass, strength, reduced body fat/waist size BUT I was hungry all the damn time.

    I never reached keto because I could not face reducing my carbs any further as my overall energy was starting to decline.


    Once can take elements of that which is what I do now.

    Cut down on bad food and alcohol and keep training, a mixture of resistance and aerobic.
     

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