derecho

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by sculptor, Aug 23, 2020.

  1. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,964
    derecho (there's a word I didn't mind not knowing)
    ok
    Damned exciting
    140 mph winds
    Uprooted or decapitated over 40 of my trees
    No power for 2 days(used up all my candles)---no power to the pumps = no gasoline
    No phone for a day, no internet for 13 days
    Is this the new norm?
    Shed roof destroyed, shingles blown off the house, tree leaning on the studio roof, sailboat mast broken....
    3 days into the cleanup, my back began to ache
    started with 3 working chainsaws----2 down for repairs(one fixed and back)---chains dull----good saws, but we pushed 'em hard and ran 'em hot.
    A lot of cleanup left to do.

    and
    many folks got it worse
    many living in tents on their lawns
    many still without power, phones, tv, and/or internet

    darned interesting------------what we take for granted
    ...........................
    so
    anything new in your life?
     
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  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    9,770
    No such thing as climate change, though, is there?

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  5. candy Registered Senior Member

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    850
    Luckily derecho is a rare event.
    Since you were out of touch you do not know that the networks mostly ignored that it happened but POTUS did declare a disaster.
     
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  7. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    ok
    I guess that that makes it official
    ...........
    as in
    "well, I do declare..........."
     
  8. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    11,070
    Sorry to hear about all that damage. At least it sounds like no one was hurt.
     
  9. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    20,523
    It sure is strange then that I can find all kinds of media coverage on the disaster. Have you been hiding in a cave?
     
  10. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    20,523
    Holy doodle!! Sorry to hear about that dude.
     
  11. foghorn Registered Senior Member

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    434
    What about your sculptures, any damaged?

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  12. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    6,964
    No................
    and
    a pine tree was actually laying on this one

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    no damage------just polished a bit where the tree rubbed her
    she was due for a good scrubbing and a coat of wax anyway
     
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  13. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    30,496
    Yep.

    With the caveat that one of its features is the absence of a reliable "norm", for a while. It's a metanorm, in a sense.

    Not the event, in other words - the range of possibility that includes the event. We've crossed one of the tipping points we were warned about a while back, and will be shifting toward the eventual new equilibrium over the next few hundred years - the old equilibrium being no longer available.

    But as several posters here have insisted is the important matter, the world was a nicer place for people to live when it was warmer - so no worries, as we look forward to a reforested Antarctica. Right?
     
  14. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,661
    No... to quote an old popular lyric.... "BBBbaby you ain't seen nothing yet..."
    The amount of water evaporating is increasing all the time.
    The amount of mass circulating the planet in the form of water vapor is increasing all the time.
    The dynamic range of weather events is increasing all the time...

    The new norm is actually the constant deterioration of global weather stability and a constant increase in dynamics. That's the new norm.
     
  15. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    6,964
    <--- filing down the rakers(depth gauges) on the chainsaw chains.
    25 is stamped on the rakers(meaning 25 thousands of an inch). I'm taking them down to 30

    still cleaning up damaged and downed trees
    The scary ones broke up high, but the tops didn't fall---still held up by a little sapwood and bark 20 feet off the ground angling down at 45 degrees-----eeek oh no

    Maybe
    I should just ignore them and lat 'em fall on their own?
     
  16. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    22,661
    Was this the storm you are posting about?
     
  17. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    30,496
    The forestry guys I worked with called them (along with other hanging snags) "widowmakers" , and did not screw around with them unless forced by circumstance (hanging over a tourist hiking trail in a park, say). When forced, they took the whole tree down (and sometimes neighboring trees) under the direction of the most experienced guy available.

    Those things can rip bark when they do fall, which in turn can kill the tree (girdling, fungus entry, etc). So if there's a safe way to take them down under control, and you want to save the tree, it's not a bad idea. Usually, there isn't - at least, not without high end machinery.

    Alternatively, laissez faire management will create some prime woodpecker habitat, with owls and flying squirrels not far behind.

    Trump's disaster declaration provided no money or other aid for individuals, and at first nothing for the Tribes and some of the badly hit counties - it was recently expanded: https://www.kcci.com/article/trump-...tribe-of-mississippi-in-iowa-derecho/33987893. Also, the actual provision of money has been slow and sporadic. The actor Aston Kutcher has apparently been somewhat more efficient and focused and capable, as has the Democrat who represents the "hardest hit region" in Congress. https://www.desmoinesregister.com/s...iowa-tuesday-derecho-cedar-rapids/3385668001/
     
  18. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,221
    A couple of years ago we had a very wet snow storm that partially broke off the top of a tree. The branches were too thin and too close together for me to climb (evergreen tree) and the hanging top was too high for me to reach in any way so that spring I cut the tree down.

    It no longer looked good, it was close to the garage and was redundant, the top wasn't heavy enough to be a real danger if it fell but there was no good reason to keep it around.

    If yours would be dangerous if the top let go, I'd cut it down.
     
  19. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    6,964
    yes
     
  20. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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