DNA change

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by Xmo1, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Was there a significant human DNA mutation near the Christ event site in century -50BC to +50AD? Pick another great leader. Seems mutations should occur after population spurts, but if a significant event occurred it might also trigger changes in DNA? Sort of a question, or a statement.
     
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  3. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    You really have no idea how evolution works, do you?
     
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  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    No idea what mutations have to do with leaders. Or leaders with population growth (Did Jesus say 'be fruitful and multiply'?).

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it's more likely to be the opposite: great die-offs will drive evolution through competition. When the populations increase, that lends to relieve evolutionary pressure (since the population is obviously not wanting for food).
     
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  7. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    Changes in DNA are caused by lots of things: stress, chemicals, natural phenomena, radiation, diseases, and many other things. But these are usually confined to individuals who are already living. My question, "Was there a significant human DNA mutation near the Christ event site in century -50BC to +50AD?" is a probe of that 100 years at a specific geography and time. I could also ask was there a significant change in DNA at the time and location of Einstein's birth, or Mozart's birth. So, is some natural, chemical, or social phenomena causing these brains to be born.

    My hypothesis is that these types of exceptional brains are biologically generated as a result of conditions, specifically social stress, experienced by small populations of humans over a relatively short period of time in a given location. Maybe you have read of the 'guess the number of jelly beans in the jar,' where <50 people asked get the right answer averaged as a group within a few percent of the actual number - every time. I think there might be enough evidence to support or not the furtherance of the hypothesis. That would make them the result of a probabilistic behavior of a group of similar organisms under stressful conditions. Could be something other than stress, but what does the DNA record reflect?

    <snicker>That seems to be what corporations are doing. They tried squeezing blood out of the turnip, but that didn't work. Now, they grind us down with stress - hoping that an exception pops that will lay the golden egg.</snicker>
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2018
  8. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    You still don't know how evolution works.
     
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    The answer to your question has to be "no".

    You seem to be confusing the life of an individual who made an exceptional contribution to human culture with some sort of change in the human genome. Not only is there no evidence at all for that idea, but there is evidence against it. If it were so, then one would expect a step-change in the capacities of a strain of humanity descended from these individuals. As there is no evidence of this, the conjecture would seem to be false.
     
  10. Xmo1 Registered Senior Member

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    That makes sense. Thanks. If it isn't evolution then what was it that caused these exceptional brains? Chance? Coffee? Chocolate? Love, if it were only so?
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Cognitive ability plots as a Bell curve. There are always exceptional brains in every population.

    These people happened to be at the right place at the right time with the right idea.

    And it isn't even necessarily dependent on an exceptional brain. There's no reason to think that Jesus was exceptionally intelligent, just that he was at the right place at the right time with the right idea.
     
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  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Who says they were exceptional brains? They were exceptional intellects. As I recall, there was a futile attempt to examine Einstein's brain after his death to determine what was special about it, without any convincing findings. It may be that there was something unusual about the brains of some of these people, or it may be the way their brains became programmed, by chance conditions during their development.

    P.S. I see DaveC has made almost exactly the same point.
     
  13. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    If we go way back in time before homo sapiens, there was a proven genetic mutation in our hominid ancestor, which may have resulted in a larger skull capacity to house a larger brain or possibly a greater folding of brain tissue.

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    http://www.evolutionpages.com/chromosome_2.htm[/quote]
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2018
  14. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    There were probably many potential Mozarts, but they didn't get the advantage of being born with access to a harpsichord or the social engines of fame.
     
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Then again, some are so brilliant that, even in isolation, with with virtually no education, no community and no access to materials at all, they pretty much re-invent their discipline from the ground up, enough to reach - and even surpass - their peers, making substantial contributions in the process.
     
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  16. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    Could be some normal variation in brain structure. Or autism. Or William's Syndrome in Christ's case.
     
  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Erroll Garner (pianist) never had a formal music lesson
    https://www.encyclopedia.com/people...ic-popular-and-jazz-biographies/erroll-garner

    Yet he created some unforgettable performances, now considered classics in jazz.

     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2018
  18. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    As far back as the archaeological record can take us, there have been people of inventive genius.

    ...................
    speaking of which
    Has anyone found verifiable Solutrean dna?
     
  19. Andrew256 Registered Senior Member

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    I'm sure there's a lot of "exceptional brains" being born into this world on a constant basis, which are unable to develop their potential due to social, economic factors, or simply haven't found the way to understand and exercise their predisposition talents.

    In other words, Einstein, Mozart (overrated if you ask me), and other exceptional talets could be just lucky to have found the spark that uncovered their talents, and resources to support those talents.
     
  20. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    And often introduce a whole new perspective with their interpretation and delivery, changing the traditional concepts into a whole new direction.
     
  21. Michael 345 Bali tonight Valued Senior Member

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    I thought he said "be fruitfly"

    Nobody understood it then either

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  22. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Haha.

    But in any case the quotations in question comes from Genesis, so it is not attributed to Jesus, i.e. the embodiment of God the Son, but the Jewish God of the Old Testament.
     
  23. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I know what you mean about Mozart. Noel Coward once described his music as like the sound of piddling on flannel. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2002/sep/28/classicalmusicandopera.artsfeatures

    I used to struggle to enjoy Mozart, until I started singing it. I have changed my mind*. However I suspect people take Mozart as an example of genius mainly because of his childhood precocity - playing the harpsichord and the violin at the age of five, and so forth. The composer whose music I personally find the most inexhaustibly fulfilling is J S Bach (against whose complexity Mozart and Haydn were a sort of reaction). But musical preference is notoriously a matter of personal taste.

    * Here is the Qui Tollis from the Gloria of Mozart's Mass in C minor:
    .
    This is fabulous to sing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2018

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