Do bees ever get tired?

wegs

Matter and Pixie Dust
Valued Senior Member
My job allows me to work from home a day or two per week, and I've been noticing outside of my work space window, a few bumble bees who are buzzing around a flower bush. These bees never seem to tire, toiling all day long. I did a little research as to ''if bees ever get tired,'' and I found two interesting articles (below)

Bees have similar sleep cycles to us, as they tend to sleep during a night cycle for eight hours. I'm tempted to set up a surveillance camera near this flower bush to see where these bees have established a hive. So far, I can't seem to locate their hive, nearby. :rolleye:

https://www.buzzaboutbees.net/do-bees-sleep.html

https://moralfibres.co.uk/how-to-revive-tired-bees/
 
What kind of bees? Honey bees?
This summer I'm getting a lot of ground-dwelling bees, because I'm re-landscaping my yard, and ground-dwelling bees tend to build their nests in dry sandy ground.
They are much smaller than honey bees; less than a half inch long.
I dug up an abandoned nest a few weeks ago. It's pretty much made of clay and sawdust.
 
These happen to be bumblebees. There is one that is HUGE. It shakes the flower stem when it lands or flies away, it’s so big! lol Would that be the Queen?

So, some hives are underground? Occasionally, wasps build a nest of clay in the corner of my back porch.
 
These happen to be bumblebees. There is one that is HUGE. It shakes the flower stem when it lands or flies away, it’s so big! lol Would that be the Queen?
Dunno. Would have thought, like honey bees, you wouldn't see the queen out.

So, some hives are underground? Occasionally, wasps build a nest of clay in the corner of my back porch.
Yeah. Go figger.
 
My answer, is that all animals probably have different levels of empathy, and this means, that they can use energies from nature in different ways to humans, whom mostly are totally numb to nature.

Some humans become empathic, but i would think its a rare thing.

So for me, i think all animals have varying degrees of empathy, and this in turn means they can use natures energies differently to humans.

Humans are mostly numb to nature, while all other animals are not, at least most of them. I would think the only other animal lacking empathy in nature, are rats.

This is my answer, and i doubt many people appreciate what i just wrote, as humans are mostly numb to nature.

Do not judge nature, on the limits of humans.
 
My job allows me to work from home a day or two per week, and I've been noticing outside of my work space window, a few bumble bees who are buzzing around a flower bush. These bees never seem to tire, toiling all day long. I did a little research as to ''if bees ever get tired,'' and I found two interesting articles (below)

Bees have similar sleep cycles to us, as they tend to sleep during a night cycle for eight hours. I'm tempted to set up a surveillance camera near this flower bush to see where these bees have established a hive. So far, I can't seem to locate their hive, nearby. :rolleye:

https://www.buzzaboutbees.net/do-bees-sleep.html

https://moralfibres.co.uk/how-to-revive-tired-bees/

A Job for your new sound recorder !
 
My job allows me to work from home a day or two per week, and I've been noticing outside of my work space window, a few bumble bees who are buzzing around a flower bush. These bees never seem to tire, toiling all day long. I did a little research as to ''if bees ever get tired,'' and I found two interesting articles (below)

Bees have similar sleep cycles to us, as they tend to sleep during a night cycle for eight hours. I'm tempted to set up a surveillance camera near this flower bush to see where these bees have established a hive. So far, I can't seem to locate their hive, nearby. :rolleye:

https://www.buzzaboutbees.net/do-bees-sleep.html

https://moralfibres.co.uk/how-to-revive-tired-bees/
You are psychic.

Just yesterday I was sitting outside after lunch, doing a Sudoku with my coffee, when a honey bee landed on the table. It buzzed about rather feebly and flew off very unsteadily, coming to rest a few metres away on the patio. It then remained motionless for about 5 minutes....and then took off normally and flew away. It really seemed to be just tired and in need of a rest. I've been wondering the same thing as you for the last 24hrs.
 
I've now looked this up and the truth is a bit sadder.

Slightly as I suspected, the odds are that the bee I saw at the end of its life and was probably on its way out. They only live 6 weeks, apparently. So it looked rather as I sometimes feel, and for similar reasons: it was just old.
 
I've now looked this up and the truth is a bit sadder.

Slightly as I suspected, the odds are that the bee I saw at the end of its life and was probably on its way out. They only live 6 weeks, apparently. So it looked rather as I sometimes feel, and for similar reasons: it was just old.

Well, sugar water apparently helps exhausted bees. Maybe try some yourself, and see if it helps? :D
 
Well, sugar water apparently helps exhausted bees. Maybe try some yourself, and see if it helps? :D
I did once give some to a bumble bee that I found inside my house after the winter, after it had woken up from hibernation and was slowly crawling about. But then I wished I hadn't: after a couple of minutes sucking up the sugar, the bloody thing started buzzing and taxiing along the floor - and then took off like a Lancaster bomber and went zooming round the room. It took me a while to get it out through the window. Next time, I'm only going to do this when the semi-comatose bee has already been taken outside.
 
:D
the bloody thing started buzzing and taxiing along the floor - and then took off like a Lancaster bomber and went zooming round the room.
"Number four's running hot, but we're gonna need everything it's got if we're gonna clear the shag carpet at the end of the strip."
- bumblebee prob'ly
 
I have a newfound respect for bees after doing some research on this. :)
 
I did once give some to a bumble bee that I found inside my house after the winter, after it had woken up from hibernation and was slowly crawling about. But then I wished I hadn't: after a couple of minutes sucking up the sugar, the bloody thing started buzzing and taxiing along the floor - and then took off like a Lancaster bomber and went zooming round the room. It took me a while to get it out through the window. Next time, I'm only going to do this when the semi-comatose bee has already been taken outside.
Problem with feeding bees in proximity of your own home is that the location will be duly translated by the bee back at the hive and you may expect more bees visiting in search of that rich food source which you so generously provided.

Of course your flowers won't complain......:rolleyes:
 
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I have a newfound respect for bees after doing some research on this. :)
Honeybees are the most productive organism on earth. In symbiosis with flowering plants they will feed about 60% of the world's herbivores, including man.
beez.jpg

Bees are some of the hardest working creatures on the planet, and because of their laborious work ethic, we owe many thanks to this amazing yet often under appreciated insect.
Our lives – and the world as a whole – would be a much different place if bees didn’t exist. To illustrate this fact, consider these numbers: bees are responsible for pollinating about one-sixth of the flowering plant species worldwide and approximately 400 different agricultural types of plant.
To say we rely on the pollination efforts of bees (and other animals) to sustain our modern food system is an understatement.
Bees are easily amongst the most important insects to humans on Earth. These humble, buzzing bugs deserve a huge thanks – for helping provide us with our favorite fruits and vegetables, their delicious honey, and beautiful, flowery gardens!
https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/why-bees-are-important-to-our-planet/

If any animal deserves our highest respect and care, it is the honeybee.
 
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