Do you worry about "death"

Discussion in 'Religion' started by Saint, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    3,834
    When will I die?
    What will happen to me after death?
    If there is heaven and hell, which one is my destiny?

    Do you ask these questions?
    I do.
    Because I am worried about death.
    Death is eerie. Something unknown to me.

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  3. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Death is inevitable, when a persons born it's not so much about living as slowly dieing, obviously chance can increase or decrease the rate that you die at. Death isn't worth fearing, however you could hope to not have a painfully messy death or a long drawn out decaying whimper.

    The only way that such a philosophy would be proven untrue however is if the universe was proven to be a simulation, then it would generate a lot of spin in regards to what life and death is actually all about considering it would be "virtually" pointless.
     
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  5. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Aw, Saint...don't be afraid.

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    To answer your question, no...not anymore.
    "Heaven and hell" are man made constructs designed to produce fear (my opinion), thus you are afraid.
     
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  7. arauca Banned Banned

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    How do you know .? What you are doing is talking your self of the uncertainty, been that way is like getting drunk to forget your problem.
     
  8. Buddha12 Valued Senior Member

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    I'm more concerned about being involved in an accident while I'm alive and being paralyized so I can't walk. There are far worse things than death I'd think because once you die there's nothing more to worry about. If we are preoccupied with death then what good is life? Just try to live life to its fullest every day and spread your love to those around you.
     
  9. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Well said!

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  10. spidergoat Liddle' Dick Tater Valued Senior Member

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    I care about disease and safety, but after death? I don't worry about that at all.
     
  11. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    Death terrifies me. "What's next?" I'll be thinking. There must be some lesson about growing old I have yet to learn. A sense of not really being part of this world anymore, ready to move on and get out of the way of the new and upcoming generations. If I live to be really old, I think I'll have a more accepting attitude towards death. That it's a natural process that starts happening even in life. If I die sooner, I won't have that comfort. I'll be like, "Why this NOW? It makes no sense!"
     
  12. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    24,690
    I just turned 70, so I'm long past the point of regarding death as some terrible event that will happen in the distant future. Each year now has a 3% probability of being my last.

    Fortunately, I've had a good, happy, fulfilling life so I have no regrets. No longing for things I wish I'd done, no accomplishments that I've never quite pulled off, no yearning for experiences that somehow always eluded me. I've been to Europe and Hawaii, I've raced motorcycles, I've played in rock bands, I've been published, I've logged a list of professional accomplishments, a couple of which have made a small but measurable impact on history, I've spent years having a good time with you folks here, I've enjoyed the love of several truly wonderful women and a larger number of truly wonderful dogs and cats.

    My major concern is that one day I will experience a major health problem that will stop me from ever being able to be in charge of my life, while at the same time reducing the quality of that life to something miserable, uncomfortable and embarrassing that will bring anguish to me and sadness to my loved ones. Yet since I live in the USA, there will be no way for anyone to terminate that life, even if I've left explicit instructions and even if my loved ones would be happy to see it happen, as a kindness to me and an end to their own feelings of futility, disloyalty and embarrassment. Not to mention the exhorbitant charges that some so-called "nursing home" will pull out of my dwindling accounts daily, so that the money I intended to bequeath to my loved ones and/or some charities will end up in the pockets of the bureaucrats in charge of the facility.

    This is what I worry about. Will the U.S. change its ridiculous laws about end-of-life issues in time to benefit me and the ones I'm leaving behind?
     
  13. Great Old One Registered Member

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    I am not particularly concerned with what will happen to 'me' after death. That seems to be a moment where an illusion of self dissipates. What remains? Whatever it is, that is what you are now IMO.

    What I am more concerned about is a situation where all humanity comes to exist in separate illusions and the universe itself apparently expands indefinitely, stars burn out, leaving the universe a cold, frozen wasteland.

    Is that going to happen, and if so what metaphysical principles underlie reality (aka God) giving rise to this apparently inevitable situation and is it possible to make peace with this while I am alive. Is this an evil situation or is God blameless? Is the eventual death of every person in existence, all societies, countries, this planet, our sun, and all stars a bad thing? That appears to be happening, although over a grand, cosmic scale.

    If it is not a bad thing, does that make the natural eschatology drawing existence to death and frozen oblivion justice for a mistaken creation?

    I find the above thoughts a little disturbing when I think about them, but I am not worried about any 'self' of mine ending up in a 'hell' or 'heaven'.
     
  14. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    So , if we do not worry about death, does it mean life is by chance?
     
  15. Great Old One Registered Member

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    That is the part I worry about.
     
  16. Hapsburg Hellenistic polytheist Valued Senior Member

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    Not really. I mean, I have some speculation about what happens after death. I generally believe in reincarnation, with possibly some mechanism for freeing the soul from the cycle of rebirth. But maybe not. Who knows?
    I don't really worry about it. Death is fascinating, and it's a big phase of the life cycle. But more important is just living your life, and enjoying it.
     
  17. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    I don't worry about it. I'm like anyone else...I've thought about it. When you actually die, there is nothing to worry about. A slow death (but faster than a lifetime) is a concern.

    Enjoy life. It's precious. In this regard (as far as we know) the animals have the right idea (or lack thereof). Live in the moment.
     
  18. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    I don't wanna die!!!!!

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    Not at least until we have a man on Mars and have made ET contact.....Then I will die a happy man!

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  19. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    It is best to only worry about events you have some ability to alter.
    When my BFF, Gloria, became upset due to her father's medical prognosis, I told her:
    A person should have a similar attitude about his/her own mortality.

    Being an atheist, I expect my death to be the absolute end. I do my best to enjoy life as I live it without thinking about my mortality.

    BTW: The only advantage I concede to theists is their smug (erroneous) belief that they expect to be able to tell the atheists.
     

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