Does cosmology answer why the universe exist?

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Saint, Nov 9, 2020.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Nonsense...Space and time [as we know them] evolved together at t+10-43 seconds. If there was no time, we have no space...no space, no time.
     
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  3. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    This is your assumption that cannot be proven in lab.
     
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  5. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    No scientific theory is proven [other then the theory of evolution]
    The overwhelming evidence supports what I said, and actually invalidates your own nonsensical claim/s.
     
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  7. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Time does not exist if there is
    1) no observer
    2) no motion of object
     
  8. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    There was no observer when space and time evolved at the BB.
    Space was expanding though, as time flowed.
     
  9. POVphysics2 Registered Member

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    Cosmologists answer how the universe exists.

    Wise men answer why the universe exists.
     
  10. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    And, what answers have those wise men provided?
     
  11. POVphysics2 Registered Member

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    The secret to happiness is, don't argue with fools.
     
  12. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    That's it? That's all you got? Does that mean you found a place with no fools considering how much you're arguing here?
     
  13. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    All of science is based on that assumption. That does not mean it needs to be exact. It only needs to be approximate. i.e. close enough to be functional.
     
  14. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Well said.
     
  15. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Saint..I like your inquiring mind and I post this with the sincere hope you will take time to watch this extraordinary NOVA video.
    It gives an overview of science and the importance of mathematical functions in the workings and evolution of the universe.
     
  16. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Why is there a sudden rush of people here wanting us all to know what they believe, but not why?

    Really: who cares what you believe? Tell me why you believe it, then we might be able to have an interesting discussion.
     
  17. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Prove it.
     
  18. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    I don't believe that it can even explain 'how'. (There are hypotheses though.)

    'Why' is something else. It seems to suggest that the universe exists as the result of a human-style act and that the act needs a motive, purpose or goal.

    That idea comes about through our very human tendency to understand events as if they were part of a larger narrative. It's the tendency to interpret reality as if it was a literary story. Reality receives a plot.

    So we get religious stories about the act of creation and about the purpose and ultimate end of creation. People like to think that way because they can plug the seemingly meaningless events of their own lives into the plot of the cosmic story so as to give the events meaning.

    It's how we understand social life and the actions of others, after all. (And that might be part of why humans evolved to think that way.)

    Physical science is similar in that it plugs particular events into a larger narrative which allows scientists to make sense of the event. But now the narrative is the narrative of a textbook and not a novel. So a physical event is plugged into the narrative of there being 'laws of physics' which explain what happened and make it more comprehensible. Facts about lifeforms are plugged into the evolution narrative (like I did up above).

    But the narratives of science are far more impersonal and abstract than the narratives of social life, literary novels or religion. They are the plot device patterns of physical reality kind of reduced to pure mathematical form (in theoretical physics' case at least).

    So to answer the question, in the eyes of the cosmologist meaning is replaced by mechanism, so to speak. The cosmologist explains an astronomical discovery by plugging it into his principles of cosmology that tell him how it might have come about and what kind of initial conditions might have led to it. The cosmologist doesn't interpret the events by relating them to some more humanistic cosmic story about goals and purposes that the astronomical events might have illustrated in the heavens.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2020
  19. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    No, it can explain how, but not the why.
    only 7 minutes long....
    Couldn't agree more.
     
    Write4U likes this.

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