Double laser experiment

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by jcc, Jul 2, 2015.

  1. jcc Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    412
    Take 2 identical laser pointers with new batteries of the same type. Turn them on and point 1 to sky, 1 to round. Leave them on and see how long the batteries last. (do this a few times so random variations cancel out). Measure for heat dumping, tie a thermometer to each of the laser pointers, and see which one gets warmer.

    if light is photon, 2 lasers should use same amount of power and dump same amount of heat.

    if light is gravitational wave, the laser point to sky will use less energy or dump more heat.

    how do you think?
     
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  3. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

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    Nonsense.
     
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  5. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    Light isn't a gravitational wave.
     
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  7. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    let's see if in the beginning we have 3 same bottle waters, center 1 is 100 degree C, left 1 is 0 C at 1 meter apart, right 1 is 0 C at 2 meters apart, and that's all the matters in the space. what would happen then?

    1. gravity will make them accelerate to each other. slowly.

    2. the left 1 will be heat up faster than the right 1.

    3. end up every bottle same 33.3333 C after a while.

    4. they stay warm forever, according to energy conservation.

    logically sounding?

    if the double laser experiment result is as predicted, does that prove that light is gravitational wave?
     
  8. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    No, because LIGHT IS NOT A GRAVITATIONAL WAVE.
     
  9. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    does laser beam able to bend a flame?

    does laser beam produce air flow?

    if laser beam is beam of photon particles, it would bend flame and produce air flow.

    from the videos i saw, never happen.

    how do you think?

    is solar sailing even possible?
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,624
    Well, you make use of these things called "synapses", you see, in what in most people is called "the brain".

    But people with wide synapses can find it hard, I realise.
     
  11. Kristoffer Giant Hyrax Valued Senior Member

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    The best thing you can say about this thread is that it's at least posted in pseudo science.
     
  12. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    it seems to me only danshawen has fair and balanced comment.

    so the rest are not interested to me.
     
  13. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    What's wrong? You haven't been banned yet, so forge ahead!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  14. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    i am not going to fall in the traps this time.

    no matter what happened, i be stay cool.

    science only, no garbage.
     
  15. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    1,834
    Already failed.
     
    Daecon likes this.
  16. jcc Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    412
    ordered 2 5mW 532nm Mid-open Green Laser Pointer. power by 2 AAA battery.

    question, 2 battery 2 x 1.4 wh =2.8 wh, laser is 5mw, so the battery will last 500 plus hours?

    looks like need bigger laser?
     
  17. jcc Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    412


    100 laser balloon popping

    if laser beam is particle beam, the energy of the beam should be the same at different distance.

    if laser beam is gravitational wave between the source atoms and the target atoms, the energy of the beam should decay by distance.

    look how fast the 1st balloon pops and how slow the last 1 is?

    Now are you convinced?
     
  18. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

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    More nonsense.
     
  19. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    21,647
    laser in essence does not really make use of the fact that it can be both wave and/or particle.
    Lasers are explained by "coherent light"
    Laser beams and gravitational waves are not the same. You remain somewhat confused. The energy of the beam decays through heating up the balloons and air around them.
    Lasers in a vacuum do not lose energy.
    See previous answers.
    I'm convinced you should read some books on physics or do some internet searching rather than making up nonsense that has been explained properly for a 100 years or more.
     
  20. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    12,806
    Both will attain the same temperature, everything else being equal.
     
  21. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    3,942
    Relatively minor defects in the respective laser cavities also need to be taken into account, because they can make a big difference in terms of efficiency.

    Once the laser beam has left the pointer, you can use mirrors or beam splitters to deflect it in any direction (or even multiple directions) you wish. It won't make a bit of difference in terms of the energy threshold required for the beam to leave the laser cavity, or the temperature the pointer achieves in the steady state.

    Laser interferometers like LIGO have thus far not detected or identified any gravity waves by means of monitoring minute differences in the optical path lengths or frequency shifts of a pair of high stability lasers reflected from mirrors at right angles to each other, surmised to be possible effects of passing gravity waves. Weber bars were likewise an expensive fiasco that produced no reproducible results in terms of detecting gravity waves, nor did it identify a successful direction for follow-on research.

    Gravity causes variations in time dilation associated with proximity to gravitating bodies, but such variations will have neither a preferred direction nor would one expect them to produce ripples in time dilation that would radiate outward from the gravitating body. Monitoring gravity waves with anything other than equipment attuned to interactions with the boson responsible for gravitational interaction is a waste of time and potentially a lot of money. Evidently, the force carrier for gravity is not a photon. Except for the bending of photons known as gravitational lensing, no other means for detecting the activity of gravitational fields exists, and in the case of gravitational lensing, this effect sometimes occurs most strongly in areas known to be free of large gravitating masses we can actually see.
     

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