Elizabeth II

Discussion in 'World Events' started by exchemist, Sep 8, 2022.

  1. O. W. Grant Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    266
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. geordief Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,103
    Where is the "truly unhinged hate"?
    Does one have the listen to the full 5 minutes of your clip to find it ?
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    Will Charles dine with Paddington Bear? How will they prevent the stink? (Asking for Saint.)
     
    candy and DaveC426913 like this.
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,298
    Seems to have been decided that the day of the funeral will be a public holiday after all, rather than just "national day of mourning".
     
  8. O. W. Grant Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    266
    Elizabeth Alexandra Mary was a trooper.
     
  9. pjdude1219 The biscuit has risen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    16,479
    thats just the kingdoms there are 3 principalities( Lichtenstein, Monaco, and Andorra which the french president is one of the monarchs for because reasons) 1 grand duchy in Luxembourg, and technically the pope is a monarch over the vatican.
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,370
    Sure. Not actual monarchs, though. Princes, really, as one had in large parts of Europe before the nation state became fashionable.
     
  11. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,790
    I've always wanted a Grand Duchy. Maybe one day...
     
  12. pjdude1219 The biscuit has risen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    16,479
    sure they are. just because the title isnt king/queen or emperor/empress doesn't make them not a monarch. the definition of monarch is a head of state who rules for life or until abdication. which is the case for all of these except princess of andorra whose succession is ex officio requiring you either to be president of france or the bishop of urgell.
     
  13. pjdude1219 The biscuit has risen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    16,479
    princess alexandra is currently unmarried so you got a chance though she is sixth in line
     
  14. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,790
    She's 85, I might pass but maybe that's a good thing if I would inherit it. Let me get back to you on that one.

    All that inbreeding might not make for the brightest of people but they sure do seem to live a long time. Hum, she might live another 15 years. I'll pass.
     
  15. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    39,237
    I'm inclined to agree. It might depend on what you mean by the "head of government", though. I'm in favour of Australia becoming a republic, provided somebody suggests a good model for how it will work. We could substitute a head of state who is hands-off when it comes to actually exerting executive power, which is effectively the current situation in Australia with the King (!) as head of state. It's not necessary to go down the American path if you want a republic. Experience has shown that - probably - the US Constitution vests too much power in the President.

    In contrast, the King's powers as head of state of Australia (and, indeed, Great Britain), are very limited and largely ceremonial. Even in the Australian constitutional crisis of 1975, when the government was sacked, the Queen played a hands-off role. On the other hand, her representative in Australia, the Governor General, was found to have some "reserve powers" by proxy that turned out to be quite significant, to say the least. The GG is not in the business of making "executive orders" like the US President can; nor does he or she have any power to veto legislation or grant pardons to criminals.

    The Australian parliamentary system followed, in many ways, the British one, although the Australian Constitution gets direct inspiration in some areas by the US one, especially in the area of allocating powers to the state and federal governments.
     
  16. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,370
    Indeed. Australia could follow the model of post-war Germany, Ireland, Italy and Israel, which separate the roles. It is interesting that these republics, with c.20th constitutions, all chose to do this, in contrast to those like the US and France that were set up in the c.18th when monarchies were the norm.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2022
  17. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,790
    Is Italy really the best role model?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  18. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    13,077
    I thought the crises was that the GG acted alone with out consulting the Queen

    And seriously needs updating

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  19. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,790
    The interesting thing is that for years, the Presidency was considered to be weak and that the real power was the power of the "Bully Pulpit". That was Teddy Roosevelt's term I think, mean the main power of the President was his persuasive ability.

    Gradually Presidents took more power and it was generally seen as a good thing when contrasted to a "do nothing" Congress. That is until is wasn't such a good thing.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Now most Presidents have abused some of those powers and then along comes Trump who does even have a general respect for the institutions and now most everyone sees that things have gone too far in terms of Presidential powers.

    I'm not sure if this particular problem is with the Constitution though although there are plenty of areas that need "updating". The current problem is more one of power being "taken" and courts upholding that.
     
  20. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    39,237
    The GG (John Kerr) did contact the Queen. From memory, I think that her response was essentially that it was a matter for Australia, not for her. Kerr also consulted High Court judge Lionel Murphy to ask whether he had the power to dismiss the government. Kerr was in cohoots with senior Liberal party members, IIRC. Fraser, who went on to become PM, knew in advanced of the plan to sack the Whitlam government and, again IIRC, encouraged Kerr.
     
  21. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,370
    Did I say it was? There are other elements to a constitution as well, you know. Why do you ignore Germany and Ireland?

    For many years we all thought the US model, with its separation of powers into three, was the ideal. But Trump has tested that proposition to destruction. We now see the judiciary is not independent of the executive, while the legislature has fallen victim to a cult of personality of the head of state, or former head of state. And since the head of the executive is the same as the head of state, all 3 branches were, and could be again, in the grip of one man. It has become clear the US president has too much power.
     
  22. pjdude1219 The biscuit has risen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    16,479
    princess Alexandra of the grand duchy of Luxembourg is only 31
     
  23. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,057
    Chiselling "Queen's Bench off the front of the courthouses and replacing it with "King's Bench" is easy? Not to mention all of the forms and documents that will have to be changed. (When our provincial government changed the name of one of it's agencies forty-some years ago, tons of letterheads had to be thrown out.)
     

Share This Page