Everlasting machine.

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by Counter, Oct 10, 2016.

  1. Counter Registered Senior Member

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    Hello.

    Could we replace every part of a machine, say a car or motorbike, so it may live forever. Is this evidence of scientific method?

    The same can also be done with a refillable lighter: replace the gas, then the flint, then after use put the flint in a new lighter. Refill with gas, use the flint etc.

    In anticipation of your replies, Counter.
     
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  3. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    I suppose it could 'live' as long as there was someone to construct and replace the parts.
    I do not see how this has anything to do with the sciencific method.
     
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  5. Counter Registered Senior Member

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    Well I was playing a game and by investing in science I could develop a cannon which had replaceable parts of every kind and could therefore be maintained and ready for battle much more easily. Hence the scientific method.
     
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  7. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    That is not the scientific method.

    Scientific Method.
     
  8. sweetpea Registered Senior Member

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    Are your asking... If we use physics to build a scientific model and later change part of that model and then later again change part of that model, do we end up with something 'looking' nothing like the original model.
    Well, physics models are not written in stone, but the changes are not made without logical reason and testing and comparing the model by observations of the thing it's modelling. By testing I mean using the model to make predictions about the thing it's modelling.
    I now thinking you don't mean this at all. But I won't delete this just in case.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2016
  9. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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  10. Counter Registered Senior Member

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    Thank you DaveC. That's exactly what I'm talking about. I maintain it WOULD be the same ship!
     
  11. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    Just like an actual cannon?
     
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  12. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    It depends on your definition of "same". If all of the parts were replaced, you'd have the same function. But in the case of an object owned by somebody famous - e.g. Abe Lincoln's axe - the parts actually touched by him are gone, so does it have the "same" value? Wouldn't it be like putting up a sign that "George Washington slept here," in the Watergate Hotel? I'd call it damn near fraudulent.
     
  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    That's actually a good point.

    I have always maintained that Theseus' ship is still Theseus', and that My Grandfather's Axe is still My Grandfather's Axe, but you have produced a situation where it does not hold true.
     
  14. Counter Registered Senior Member

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    But there is a sign that states, "Abraham Lincoln's axe." This is just as a car with all parts replaced would have a log book recording the status of the original car. Even if the number plates change, or the serial number of parts change, it would all be recorded in the log book. Then...a new log book for the original car!
     
  15. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Is not our own body an example of Theseus' ship? Do we not replace our cells over time, with very few, if any, of the original cells lasting until we die naturally?

    It's very much caught up with the notion of ownership, and a further question would be as to how much of our own body we could replace with artificial parts before it is not us?

    It also raises questions of teleportation, and whether the person at the other end of it would be the same "you" as got in?

    But if we're talking about an everlasting machine then bear in mind you would need an infinite number of spare parts, requiring an infinite amount of resources.
     
  16. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    If you change the oil in Elvis' Cadillac you can still call it Elvis' Cadillac. But if you take the radio out of Elvis' Cadillac and put it in your Volkswagen, can you legitimately call it Elvis' Cadillac? Or Even Elvis' Volkswagen?
     
  17. Counter Registered Senior Member

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    Exactly. It was recently broadcast on the news a "head transplant," which raises such a question. Whatever next, a dogs head on a mans body?
     
  18. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Been there. Done that.

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  19. Counter Registered Senior Member

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