Guitar Enthusiasts

Discussion in 'Art & Culture' started by Bowser, Sep 28, 2015.

  1. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    I also have a Seagull acoustic with a solid cedar front plate. Nice guitar indeed.
     
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  3. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I took the scratch plate off mine.
    She is a little worn but nice guitar.
    The bridge needs fixing it has split but I have been working on the little 3 string and the Seagull has been neglected.
    I purchased a kids stat copy for only $70 at Kmart mainly to get bits and I will make it a small 3 string. It even had a little amp. Chinese but nice work great little neck. Shame to scrap it. I will take 3 of the machine heads for the one I am making.

    Wish they were around when I was a kid.
    Alex
     
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  5. wellwisher Banned Banned

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    I was watching a biography of Dick Dale, who is considered the king of the surf guitar. Early in his career, he became part of the development team for the Fender Strata-caster guitar. He had a unique playing style and was given one of the prototypes to try. Being left handed, he played the right handed prototype guitar upside down and backwards. He redid the cords, giving him a unique sound. He was involved in guitar development with Fender, for years adding many feature to the modern guitar. Dick Dale was also involved in their Fender Amplifier development, burning out hundreds of amps, forcing the state of the art to design new types of amps that could handle his hard driving reverb style.
     
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  7. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Jimi Hendrix was also left-handed and did the same thing. However, by then left-handed guitars were routinely available--surely Paul McCartney had something to do with this.

    As far as I know, violins are still only made for right-handed playing. I'm sure the reason is that almost all violinists play in orchestras, at least some of the time. They sit next to each other so they have to be pointed in the same direction to avoid poking each other's eyes out.
     
  8. gmilam Valued Senior Member

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    2,663
    No, Jimi typically took a right handed guitar and strung it left handed. You can tell this from just about any close up picture of him on stage.

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    The only left handed violinist I can think of is whoever played with Bob Wills Texas Playboys. Don't know the man's name.
     
  9. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    In the fiddle world lefthanded instruments are fairly common.

    And they are more or less routinely available in the classical world as well - the major difficulty is not in finding an instrument:
    http://www.captainfiddle.com/leftmusicmaking.html
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2016
  10. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    I recall reading in a guitar magazine that he thought left handed guitars could not be as good as right handed guitars. Certainly he had opportunity to use a lefty but did not.
    Alex
     
  11. gmilam Valued Senior Member

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    2,663
    Yeah, don't know.

    I've noticed that Dick Dale takes a left handed guitar, strings it right handed, and then plays left handed. Go figure.

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  12. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    From years ago, ruff and I never got around to doing a better one..first take.
    Alex
     
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  13. scorpius a realist Valued Senior Member

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    I threw my guitar away after hearing this kid play

     
  14. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I've met a couple of people who were given guitars by doting parents who had no idea how the things work. With no one around to help, they simply developed their own tunings and learned how to play that way.

    One lived in a big city and eventually found mentors who showed him the conventional tuning. But the other lived out in the boondocks. By the time he met someone who explained the "proper" tuning, he had been playing his own way for many years and was quite happy with the results.
     

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