Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    An accolade is any form of praise, including simply saying, "You did a very good job of washing the car." Nonetheless, the word is generally reserved for something a little more formal; at the very least, to praise someone when several other people are present to hear it.

    And no, it's not a title.
    "The demand for..." is correct. It means that the demander wants or needs more solar energy. This is often used in the plural: "The demands for solar energy greatly exceed the capacity of today's technology to provide it."
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017 at 8:23 PM
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  3. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    accrue to someone or something
    [used of interest paid on money] to be credited to an account or to a person's account. Interest will accrue to your account as long as the account is active.

    Can I write:
    Interest will accumulate in your account as long as the account is active.
     
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  5. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    To accrue means to be credited to an account for monies earned on an on-going basis but not yet paid. So interst accrues each day the account is open and is paid on a regular basis (e.g. monthly).

    To accumulate means to gather things in to an increasingly larger pile or sum.
    So with regards interest, this will only accumulate in your account if you never withdraw it, as it will slowly build up into an ever larger sum.

    So while your proposed sentence is grammatically correct, I'm not sure it is saying what you intend (or perhaps it is?).
     
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  7. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    No. The verb "accrue" and the noun "accrual" have specific meanings in the banking industry. Interest accrues at a steady rate, so you can predict how quickly your account will grow, based on the current interest rate.
     
  8. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Russia has 'compromising and salacious' information on Donald Trump, CNN reports

    Intel chiefs briefed Trump, Obama on unverified, salacious allegations concerning Russia and president-elect


    salacious = arousing or appealing to sexual desire or imagination

    In this case, why use the word salacious pertaining to the hacking of election system?
     
  9. Ophiolite Valued Senior Member

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    The hacking of the electoral system is not salacious. The suggestion is that Russia has obtained information about Trump that is salacious. ie the suggestion is that they have evidence that he has been engaged in bizarre or illegal sexual practices. Thus, it is his behaviour that is alleged to be salacious.
     
  10. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    "Salacious" has a more general meaning; it isn't just about sex and other prurient interests. It can also mean simply gross indecency. "Indecency" (just like "decency") can be used for many kinds of bad things.
     
  11. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    • A debit is an accounting entry that either increases an asset or expense account, or decreases a liability or equity account. It is positioned to the left in an accounting entry.
    • A credit is an accounting entry that either increases a liability or equity account, or decreases an asset or expense account. It is positioned to the right in an accounting entry.
    When I make payment to my credit card, my debt is reduced, right?
    But why the payment amount is shown on the Credit column?

    What is liability, equity?
    Debt is liability?
     
  12. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, when you make a payment to your credit card you are paying off some of the debt that you have built up, so your debt is reduced.
    The statement you receive is shown from the bank's position, and in double-entry terms, when you buy something using a credit card, the bank will Debit your account with them, and Credit their own cash balance.
    So your debt to the bank increases.
    When you pay off some of that debt, the bank will Debit their cash balance and Credit your account, thereby reducing the debt that you owe them.

    From your point of view, however, the bank is who you owe money to, so they are a creditor, a liability. Every time you use the card you are increasing that liability. So if you were keeping records you would increase the Credit amount to the bank and Debit your asset account with whatever you have bought. When you pay off the debt to the bank you would Debit the amount you owe and Credit your own cash account.

    But the statement you get from the bank is from their perspective, not yours. Hence it will seem the other way round to what you might expect.
    A debt is simply a sum of money (or other consideration) that is due from one party to another.
    A liability is what you owe someone. It is a debt owed by you to someone.
    An asset would be a debt owed from someone to you.
    So if you owe me some money then that debt is an asset for me and a liability for you.

    Equity is what you own of a certain class of assets. E.g. The shareholder's equity is the total equity they hold in the business and is the net of all assets less all liabilities.
    Similarly the equity someone holds in their house would be the value of the asset less any mortgage they might have still to pay.
     

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