Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Certain car model is coupé, how to pronounce it?
    is coupé a borrowed word?
     
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  3. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    It's a French word, the past participle of the verb couper "to cut". If a word in English has an accent on it, that vowel is always pronounced: here COOPEE or COOPAY or somewhere between.
     
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  5. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    In UK it's usually the COO-PAY variant... at least that's all I've ever heard that I can recall.
     
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  7. geordief Registered Senior Member

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    I always had it in my mind that it was an American usage- but I can't find a British equivalent or synonym.

    Even so I rarely hear it used .Is it used more often in the States as being more noteworthy because cars have always been bigger over there and 2 doors would be seen as penny pinching?
     
  8. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    169
    That is hilarious. It had me totally baffled until I googled it. I knew the etymology, but my interest in cars is so minimal that I have always assumed that the "cutting" was horizontal. All my life I thought a coupé was the same as a convertible. How sad is that? It's never too late to learn.
     
  9. geordief Registered Senior Member

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    ditto
     
  10. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    The US pronounce it COOP, I think (as in Coupe de Ville).
    Coupe is quite commonly used here. They tend to be the sportier versions of cars. But if you have no particular interest in cars then I guess it's just about understandable you wouldn't have heard the word, or know what it meant.

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  11. DrKrettin Registered Senior Member

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    Well that's the thing - I've heard the word plenty of times (always COOPAY, never COOP) because these days it is impossible not to hear men talking about cars and golf even if I have no interest in either. But I have always had the wrong idea of what it meant.
     
  12. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    In America, it is almost always pronounced as one syllable: COOP. However, in my youth (the 1940s and 50s) it was more often pronounced as two syllables: coo-PAY. I think it was in the 1960s when Americans began to pronounce it COOP.

    Today, nobody pronounces it as two syllables anymore.
     
  13. Saint Valued Senior Member

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  14. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    The verb "to nestle" is to lie comfortably against something, and is pronounced NESS-ul (silent "t" - and the end "-ul" sound is the same as in "people", "couple", "double" etc.

    The brand name "Nestle" is that of a Swiss company (named after the founder of one of the original companies), and technically has an accent over the last "e". In the UK (not sure about elsewhere, or even if it's as per the original Swiss) we pronounce the name of this company as NESS-lay - again with a silent "t".
     
  15. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    In America, most of us pronounce it NESS-lee, but there are quite a few Americans who pronounce the T, so it comes out NEST-lee.

    We all seem to be able to distinguish between the verb "nestle," which is pronounced NESS-'l (with no T), and the name of the company.
     
  16. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    vetting through means examining in details?
     
  17. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    The verb "vet" means to appraise, verify, or check something for accuracy, authenticity, validity, etc.

    "Vetting through" is a rather awkward phrase. Without seeing your original source, I would assume that it refers to a vetting process that is a little more complicated than usual, and is expected to result in better accuracy--or at least tries to!

    "Vet" is also universally used in the USA as a noun: slang for both "veterinarian" (a doctor who treats animals, both pets and livestock) and "veteran" (a person who has served in the armed forces).
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  18. geordief Registered Senior Member

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    532
    Maybe the source was "thorough vetting" ? Or the "through" was introducing a phrase that followed and unconnected to "vetting"........eg "he underwent vetting through a long process"
     
  19. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    How to pronounce this "devolatilization" ?
     
  20. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    I think part of the pronunciation will depend on where people come from.

    Me, I would pronounce it Dee-VOLLER-till-is-ation

    The "ation" is as per relation, nation, probation
     
  21. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    dee-VOLL-it-ill-ize-AY-shun
     
  22. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Wahy Sergeant is pronounced Sar-jen?
    Ser?
     
  23. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Don't forget th "t" sound on the end.

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    . SAR-junt

    As for why it is pronounced that way, it's a word taken from the French, who pronounce it more like SER- but over the last 700 years or so it has simply changed pronunciation in English to SAR-
    Not sure of any particular reason why, but possibly the upper class influence within the military officers, and the way they pronounced it.
     

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