Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    This is an old word from the vocabulary of the theater.

    If the star has a very long speech to give... but then one of the lesser cast members follows him up by giving a speech of his own, which is not even in the libretto, he is trying to upstage the star.
    Yes, that is a real word, but it is only used to describe an area on the stage.
     
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  3. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    In The Magnificent Seven, newcomer Steve McQueen upstaged the big star Yul Brynner by rattling a shotgun shell, removing his hat, etc. - anything to be the center of attention.
     
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  5. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    There need be nothing "considerable" about it.
    A drawdown is merely the removal of a portion of the holding, be it funds, a reserve of product etc.
    A well funded portfolio, for example, might allow for drawdowns sufficient to maintain one's lifestyle without actually reducing the initial capital, with each drawdown offset by growth in the investments.
     
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  7. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    tyre or tire?
     
  8. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    In the UK "to tire" is a verb meaning "to grow weary", and "tyre" is the (usually rubber) covering around a wheel.
    However, I think in the US they use "tire" for both.
     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    We do, indeed.
     
  10. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    online, on-line, on line,
    which one is correct?

    "I like to play online game." ---------- correct?
     
  11. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    I think "tyre" is a better word, tire is just too strange.
     
  12. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    It started out as "on-line" but more recently the world seems to favour "online".
    You could use either and be understood, but "online" is probably today's preferred version.
    "On line" is wrong.

    No.
    "I like to play online games."
     
  13. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Some people say CV and resume are not exactly the same, true?
     
  14. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    CV stands for Curriculum vitae, and it means a presentation of things you've done, like which schools you've gone to, what sports, what interests, etc.

    A résumé is a chronological list of your job history and qualifications for the job you're interviewing for.

    Please, anyone feel free to correct me. I'm retired, and have put all that crap out of my mind for the most part.
     
  15. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    In the UK we almost exclusively talk about CVs and not resumes (Rez-oo-Mays) and would consider the words interchangeable.

    In the US it is different, and they are distinct.
    The resume is a very short (typically 1 page) summary of job experience and qualifications specific to the role you're going for.
    I.e. It's the brief answer to the question "why should I hire you?"
    They typically may include a section on career goal / objective, and their aim is to make you stand out from the crowd if the reader is only given a few seconds to decide on who to ask to interview.

    The CV, on the other hand, is intended as an objective detailing of accomplishments, primarily academic, and so is generally much longer, with the expectation that the reader will actually read the detailed content rather than the sound-bites of a resume.

    Imagine the CV is like the full business case, and the resume is like the advertising pitch.

    But as said, in the UK we really on deal in CVs, and they're probably a half-way between the US resume and US CV.
     
  16. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    "cradle to cradle" means what?
     
  17. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    I've only heard of Cradle-to-cradle as an environmentally-focused design concept, whereby the overall design of the object or process is to be as free of waste as possible.
    This may mean building an object specifically out of material that has an alternate use if/when scrapped.
    I'm sure the Internet has some better explanation.

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  18. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    For me, a resume would answer the question "why should I hire you?" A CV would answer the question "why should I NOT hire you?" There would be a lot of stuff in there that I don't want people to know, which is why I've never written one.
     
  19. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Is "screw up" rude?
    Any other phrase to replace it?
     
  20. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Any difference between completed and finished?

    1. Your life is finished if you married a wrong woman.

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  21. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    It's not so rude that it isn't allowed on the BBC during the day.
    So I would say that these days it is not all that rude.
    There are however more polite ways of saying it, such is "mess up", "muck up", "foul up".

    Often they are synonymous.
    If you completed a task then you finished a task.

    However, "to be finished" can have a different meaning than just "to be completed".
    It can also mean "to be over in a detrimental manner".
    So if someone says "your life is finished if you marry the wrong woman" then they mean that the enjoyable life you know at the moment will be over, and your life will be terrible.
     
  22. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    I will be flying to London in/with first class seat.
    Which preposition?
     
  23. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    That would be 'in', but better yet, "I will be flying first class to London."
     

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