Hmm, a room temperature superconductor

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by geordief, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    river and Ethernos 1997 like this.
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  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Nowhere near. In fact completely pointless.

    It is at least possible to cool conductors in some circumstances so that superconductivity can be achieved. CERN relies on superconducting electromagnets, if I'm not mistaken. But these absurd pressures are quite impractical.

    And the suggestion that this somehow opens the door to the same thing at lower pressures doesn't seem to stand up. It looks to me like an obscure curiosity and that the researchers are hyping it in the hope of further grant money.
     
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  5. Hipparchia Registered Senior Member

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    So you discount the researchers expectation that "The introduction of chemical tuning within our ternary system could enable the preservation of the properties of room-temperature superconductivity at lower pressures." What is your reasoning?
     
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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I discount it because I do not find that statement at all persuasive. The abstract makes no mention of evidence of any "tuning" that has shown promise in this respect, nor of any theoretical reason why it might be a reasonable expectation. And the gap to be bridged in pressure is enormous. The pressures they are using are of the same order as those needed to produce a metallic phase of hydrogen.
     
  8. Ethernos 1997 Registered Senior Member

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    technique is the same but can be further developed with carbon to create graphine which would be stable even in room temperature. but before it is created lot of pressure is going to be needed to make that.
     
  9. JohnSoto Registered Member

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    How many interesting approaches are here. Thanks for sharing with us!
     
    river likes this.
  10. river

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    From JohnSoto ; in
    General Science & Technology



    No surprise really , the higher the temperature , the greater the outward pressure , from the source .

    In the Cold , minus 400 Kelvin , the closer physically things can get , no pressure needed . Hence the superconductivity without friction of any kind .
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2020

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