How do we find the ''best'' explanation?

Discussion in 'General Philosophy' started by wegs, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    If you want to criticise the Yanks for the way they speak English, you better get you facts right. The word "piqued" isn't a French word, you know.
    EB
     
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  3. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    OK, but what does it mean in proper English?
    EB
     
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  5. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Sorry, I have no cure for myopia. You know what that means , in English?
     
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  7. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    I asked you a simple question and then again, no proper answer.
    Telling lies will always get you into trouble. You should know that.
    EB
     
  8. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    "Proper English" is a bit of an oxymoron.
     
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  9. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Well, unless you want to go back all the way to Latin;
     
  10. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    I have to disagree. Each of his words was recognisably an English word. You have to suspect he really tried to form an English sentence. So you have to cut him some slack. He's busy spinning a tale which can only be unbelievable and so it's probably quite hard and the strain eventually has to show in the poor quality of his English.
    EB
     
  11. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    No, Sir. There's definitely a French word "pique" and it's spelled, well, p-i-q-u-e. Not "piqued", as you wrote. See? "Piqued" is definitely an English word.
    EB
     
  12. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    So, again, what does that mean in good English?
    EB
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    I am the one who is cutting him some slack. There's nothing wrong with a little creativity in the use of English words.
     
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  14. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    ???
    Am I not?
    Yes I am. I'm all for a creative use of English as well. I'm doing it myself and everybody is doing it and very often. It's part and parcel of speaking not only English but French too and probably any language.
    EB
     
  15. river

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    So how do we find , the BEST explanation ?

    Other than being creative in any language ?

    Is by objective observation of all Life and energy/matter
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  16. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    So, my curiosity was peaked, had peaked, had reached a high point.

    The interesting part of this whole exercise is that everyone knew exactly what I was saying.
    Therefore the context was clearly understood by all. IOW, I was had successfully conveyed an observation about myself.

    I suppose it is relatable to the OP, "how do we find the "best" explanation"........

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    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    IMO, humans as well as many other animals or organisms, experience comfort. Familiarity brings comfort. And that is sufficient, IMO. "Movement in the direction of greatest satisfaction"

    Certain harmonic wave lengths are extremely compatible with our state of mind. This is why we love music. Certain visual patterns are pleasing and compatible with our internal patterns. We seek warmth in winter, cool in summer, shelter from the rain. All very practical.

    Knowing the differences from a series of experiences allows us to strive for the "best explanation".....

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    But even the paramecium knows how to "navigate" unpleasant obstacles (patterns).
    This thing goes way back.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  18. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    I very much doubt if paramecium "knows" anything

    The navigation would be a automatic response with no knowledge attached

    No ability to know of said obstacle in advance (memory)

    No ability to react PRIOR to reaching said obstacle

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  19. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    Is that any kind of argument?!
    Seems like a non-sequitur to me.
    In other words, does the fact that people are creative with language, and that they need to be creative, justifies a priori anything you want to say just because you're being creative with language?!
    You're being very creative and very illogical.
    EB
     
  20. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    No.
    EB
     
  21. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Enlightning.
     
  22. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Apparently it is able to "learn".

    Another non-neural, non-brained organism, the Slime Mold is definitely able to learn, and has a sense of time.
    These may not necessarily be conscious operations, but the fact remains they can learn and adjust their behavior accordingly. Does it matter if it is conscious, subconscious, or purely chemical? If it can learn, it can learn. Is see these organisms as progenitors of more complex
    of organisms with more sophisticated abilities.


    The interesting part is that it imitates a neural network for information processing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  23. Speakpigeon Valued Senior Member

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    Enlightening.
    EB
     

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