Is it possible to illuminate a planet artificially from orbit?

Discussion in 'SciFi & Fantasy' started by cosmictotem, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. cosmictotem Registered Senior Member

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    Yes. And solar farm, to be precise.
     
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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Oh. You intend to use it as a power source, not as a light source.
     
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  5. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    It's not practical to get close to the same power level we have during the daytime (1000 watts/sq m) with orbital mirrors.
     
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  7. ajanta Registered Senior Member

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    597
    Thanks for it. Yes, now I think if photon is hot it would radiate photon that is not possible. So it is not hot.
     
  8. ajanta Registered Senior Member

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    I think artificial fusion (To produce energy) and increasing CO2 emission can solve the problem to a cold planet.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016
  9. Baldeee Registered Senior Member

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    To supply a 100 km2 farm with solar energy from orbit via mirrors, of the same intensity as normal sunlight during the day, would presumably require a mirror of the same size?
    I.e. 100 km2?
    If you use smaller but widen the projection area then the intensity drops.
    Not sure what the useful level is for solar cells, though?

    Alternatively, collect the energy at the satellite (so don't use mirrors but use solar cells instead) and find a means of transmitting to earth (microwave transmission, for example, although the area on earth would still need to be quite large).
    If laser could work then the ground station could be far smaller.
     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    12,538
    Far larger. It depends on the planarity of the mirror, the altitude it orbits at and any obliqueness (which will be a necessary part of its orbit.)
     

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