Is metal bound with some other atom{s}...?

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by Beer w/Straw, Sep 8, 2022.

  1. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    Like steel?



    This may help me with my major.

    I saw the shredder take apart concrete.

    ' ' '

    I watched that above after seeing this wierd story.

     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2022
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  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    This thread does not make any sense. What are you trying to ask?
     
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  5. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    I wanted to know the chemicals of the metal used in an industrial shredder. Steel is iron, carbon and something else.




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    What are metal shredder blades made of?
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    Most of the shredders are produced of carburizing steel and tool steel, but for some application, we also use chromium, molybdenum, and manganese low allow steels as well as Hardox® or equivalent steels.





    Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral. It is found in foods such as milk, cheese, cereal grains, legumes, nuts, leafy vegetables, and organ meats. Molybdenum is most commonly used for molybdenum deficiency.


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  7. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Thinking of building one?

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  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    This is largely an engineering question. I had to look it up and found this: http://www.plasticshredderblades.com/supplier-321331-tire-shredder-blades

    It appears that SKD11 is this: https://www.theworldmaterial.com/skd10-skd11-steel/

    So high carbon, high Cr, but with some V and Mo as well. I'm not a metallurgist so I can't comment on what all these ingredients do in the alloy.
     
  9. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    I wanted to know the composition of the molecule.
     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    That metal is an alloy, not a molecule.

    In compounds, the outer valence electrons are "filled" by sharing with other outer valence electrons of specific other atoms. For example, in water, the two hydrogens each "want" one more valence electron to fill that valence. Oxygen provides those two electrons. So the resulting molecule is very stable, with the hydrogen and oxygen atoms now having their "happy" number of valence electrons.

    Metal doesn't work like that. Metal shares its outer valence electrons with many other nearby atoms. (This is why metals are conductive.) Alloys are more of a mix of atoms than a molecule.
     
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  11. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    What is the difference between an alloy and a molecule?

    Or should I already know that?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2022
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    There are two basic types of bonding structure in chemistry: molecules and giant structures. In molecular structures, there are covalent bonds between the atoms that group them into self-contained units of the element or compound in question. Examples would include nitrogen, N-N (though it is in fact a triple bond - something I can't represent in text characters) and carbon dioxide, O=C=O. Giant structures, on the other hand, are so called because there are no discrete molecules, but a single large array of atoms. Giant structures can have covalent, ionic or metallic bonding between the atoms. Diamond and quartz are examples of giant covalent structures. Common salt (NaCl) - or any other salt (say copper sulphate, CuSO4.7H2O) - are examples of a giant ionic structure. Any metal is an example of a giant metallic structure. This is true of both elements and alloys.

    Metallic elements have a low first ionisation energy, meaning that it is relatively easy to pull at least one electron away from the atom. This is why they form +ve ions in compounds. In a metallic structure, the atoms have "pooled" these easily detached electrons in a giant common "orbital" that extends throughout the crystal. So you have +ve ions embedded in a sea of electrons that can no longer be said to belong to any one atom.

    In the case of a pure element, all these +ve ions are identical, arranged in a regular 3D array. In the case of an alloy, some of the locations in the array may be taken by atoms of a second or 3rd element, or else they may fit into gaps between the atoms of the array. They too may donate electrons to the metallic bonding "sea". The effect is to disturb the 3D lattice a bit, and to alter the crystal shapes and mechanical and chemical properties of the metal, in subtle ways. Not being a metallurgist, I can't explain the details I'm afraid.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2022
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