Is time a measure of history ?

Discussion in 'The Cesspool' started by Tyler Shaw, Nov 13, 2021.

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  1. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    Measured at the duration of 1.s of history per 1.s of time passed measured ?
     
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  3. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    Question is vague!!
     
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  5. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    Well pal , thought the question was easy enough . Throughout history we have measured time but over the generations have added complexity to what time is . There is said to be time dilation and time travel based on time , but isn't the reality of time , we are just measuring history ?

    Again we have to involve Einstein here and consider what he meant by space-time compared to time . We measure history at 1.s of history per 1.s of time passed measured . Well pal Einstein and/or Minowski came up with space-time so we can plan or plot future events based on the fact that space-time energy is indistinguishable from space and we can observe our forward journey and/or destination simultaneously to our own reference frame of time . When Einstein said we are looking out into the future he meant if we travelled there and that would be a future destination , time for any observer would be measured at 1.s of history per 1.s second measured regardless of simultaneity because of c , the speed light travels at .
    What this means is that if your Caesium clock was ticking slower than my Caesium clock , we'd both experience the 1.s of history measured by my clock . Well pal , people misunderstand that a change in frequency of the Caesium atom , that is not a change in real time , history , it is a change in timing and to do with the GPS systems because of angular incident signals .
    So we are now on clearing up that misunderstanding of the populous too dude .

    Note ; The Caesium clock requires no batteries and is a valuable product .
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2021
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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Aha, I was wondering how long it would be before caesium clocks made an appearance.

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  8. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    well pal we can't keep going into space to change batteries , the caesium is long lasting
     
  9. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    Given someone's doctor appointment at 10:30 on Tuesday morning -- and all the other human preparation for the future -- surely not.

    CUSTOMER #1: "Why did you weigh your apples on the oranges scale?"

    CUSTOMER #2: "Huh? It's for apples, too."

    CUSTOMER #1: "No, it's not."

    CUSTOMER #2: "Yes, it is."

    CUSTOMER #3: "Impossible. This bag of bananas can't weigh that much."
     
  10. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    10.30 on Tuesday morning is not guaranteed to be there , you are counting your chickens before they been hatched . Look behind you when you walk and see your past location that co-exists in your present and future location . However you might age less !
     
  11. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    No.
    The "question" is meaningless.
    No.
    The word is "populace".
    Ya think?
     
  12. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    What is it a measure of then ?
     
  13. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    Time is measured. Measuring history? What is the definition?
     
  14. Tyler Shaw Banned Banned

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    Presently , ''Time in physics is defined by its measurement: time is what a clock reads.[1] In classical, non-relativistic physics, it is a scalar quantity (often denoted by the symbol {\displaystyle t}

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    ) and, like length, mass, and charge, is usually described as a fundamental quantity. Time can be combined mathematically with other physical quantities to derive other concepts such as motion, kinetic energy and time-dependent fields. Timekeeping is a complex of technological and scientific issues, and part of the foundation of recordkeeping.''

    I have put inbold an important part .

    That means history right ?
     
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