It's much easier to apologize, than it is to get permission

Discussion in 'Ethics, Morality, & Justice' started by wegs, May 3, 2019.

  1. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Butt in a good way and I didn't play dumb.

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  3. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    Of course.

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  5. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    You're fired, anyway!
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    This is a tough crowd.
     
  8. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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  9. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    poetry in prose dare not breath for the air it has given
     
  10. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    Funnily enough, I haven't been doing either lately, and things have been going well at work. I've stopped asking for permission, do what I think makes the most sense, and not even sorry.

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    Should my decisions cause problems down the road, I guess an apology would make sense.

    Goes to show that sometimes we may second guess ourselves, worried more about what others (bosses, etc) may think, instead of focusing on the potential positive outcome of our decisions. I can't help but think that all this second guessing, stifles our productivity.
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    So, did you stay at your job? Are you getting along with the boss?
     
  12. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    Yes and yes.

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    Things actually have been working out great, lately!! Thanks for asking.
     
  13. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    That means that we are doing a good job raising you. It's tough being a parent but we live though you.

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  14. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    intuitive reason requires force to acquire and maintain its own boundary of reality.
     
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  15. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Started a long staff fight, once, in which my boss ended up invoking a "stupid rule", of sorts, in order to make room for bigotry.

    I had a colleague that used to recite the Hopper line, but it never made sense in our context; it was just a vapid excuse for prejudice. Seriously, he could watch our bosses literally invent one-time rules to disrupt and undermine their staff, and then wonder aloud, without irony, why his colleagues weren't acting instead of seeking permission. To the other, it's one thing to recite the line; he never really did act, and when it came down to it, he was just as given to his prejudice as our bosses. And instead of acting in an hour of need, the colleague instead chose to go with his prejudices according to what he thought some bitch deserved.

    As for such bosses, it is much easier for them to act when they expect to never apologize.

    'Tis a charming aphorism, to be certain, but requires empowerment in order to be effective.
     
  16. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    Okay, I laughed

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    You ''started'' ...

    This kind of stuff is so disruptive, not just on a grander employer bottom line profit scale, but emotionally/mentally on a day to day basis...dealing with this petty crap. How are things, now?

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  17. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Unbelievable.

    In any given moment, the general shape seems pretty apparent. The actual detail is a question of how much effort one wants to put into figuring particular human will, and one of the most apparent indicators is the pretense that nothing is going on. There is a comedic stereotype about British civil servants and bureaucrats being utterly catty to one another at the office, and I think of a Scottish pop song↱ about bureaucracy and rescuing management's ass from the proverbial fire; this is more like the idea that a supervisor would finally take the time to schedule a mandatory staff exercise, that the team might finally take ownership for and grow past the perpetual bickering, not only while the actual building is actually on fire, but also to change the subject from discussing the fact that the place is literally burning down.

    Well, that, and this weird echo of a question that comes up way too much in the world, these days, and runs, "Could you please fail to ...?" Which is its own discussion, for another time.

    But, yes, all in all, unbelievable.
     
  18. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    lol Wow.

    In the midst of all of this, some work is actually getting done, right?

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    It's weird that we're all experiencing some form of office dysfunction, isn't it?
     
  19. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Depends on who you ask.

    I don't know how it works in other societies, like, say Britain or Australia, or even Canada, but in addition to humans being frail, neurotic creatures, American society is presently stormblown and stumbling and yet to countenance the full measure of our dysfunction, but ... again, it's a really rough sketch, and it's like a bunch of people have the wrong idea about what they fear, and it's morbidly-comedically awful to even try to figure or describe, but it seems like some people will concede to a proposition of, or perhaps even declare, their own dysfunction and incompetence, because they think it absolves them of some particular context of guilt, and they somehow believe they will be allowed to wallow freely in their own indulgence.

    Not only are many offices dysfunctional in their own way; bureau-cattiness as a stereotype comes from something common enough for Brits to catch on, and I once worked for an insurance company that didn't know what was in its own training materials and procedural manuals. ("What did you expect me to do?"—Follow the manual!—"I did!") Of course, we also hired a guy to administrative services ... Goddess grant, don't get me started on alphabetical order.

    Oh, right, I blew that last paragraph: Not only are many offices dysfunctional in their own way, deep fry the whole thing in American Munchausen-Omni Syndrome, wherein the omni syndrome compelling people to behave according to a perceived common merit is based on what appears to be sociocomparative Munchausen Syndrome by which empowered people pretend or believe themselves not simply commonly disempowered, but, rather, extraordinarily disempowered and oppressed.

    Once that roots in an office, well, good luck.

    For Americans, the quiet conventions by which people grit up and deal with one another are strained, and that's another thing I probably shouldn't start on, at present.
     
  20. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    I hope that answers your questions Wegs.
     
  21. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    Tiassa, Reliably on point

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  22. wegs With brave wings, she flies . . . Valued Senior Member

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    In my company, there are a few clients based in Canada, and they are far kinder to deal with than the American clients. I can't help but wonder that their office environments are probably less dramatic than those in the states and so they don't have that tension that comes through the phone, like when I'm dealing with American clients. This is just a broad observation, but something that's hard to not notice.

    Not trying to cast a wide net and generalize, but Americans are just more competitive it seems, than our international peers. But, cattiness and such isn't just an American thing, it can very well be a human thing.

    What tends to make the difference in how well everyone ''gets along'' in their respective work spaces, is the tone of management. If management doesn't trust anyone in the organization and micro manages for example, then those attitudes (may) trickle down throughout the company, and soon enough, there exists this underlying current of distrust that shows itself in how you describe your work experiences.

    We are responsible for our own behaviors, for sure, but show me a company where pretty much everyone is back stabbing and ruthless to their peers, and invariably, it'll point to a CEO who represents those attitudes. I try to just do my own thing and not let others' behaviors dictate mine.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
  23. kx000 Valued Senior Member

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    And it's even better to forgive than it is to be sorry.
     

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