Myths about pendulums

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by trevor borocz johnson, Dec 12, 2022.

  1. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

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    I read an article that Davinci wrote math equations for the first pendulum. It was a chandalier in the leaning tower of Pisa and they noticed that it would swing for an exceptionally long time. Since then I've pondered if the pendulum can be used in a mechanical circuit to draw energy into it, specifically that of pain but also emotion, and of course I have other magic parts of the circuit like one way mirrors that allow the energy through but not back. But I'd like to attach the pendulum to a computer and test it with different white noise functions to see if it creates a signal of any kind.
     
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  3. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    trevor:

    This is sciforums, not magiforums.

    Please take your nonsense elsewhere.
     
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  5. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    That was supposedly Galileo, not Da Vinci.
     
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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    And there are no chandeliers in the Leaning Tower of Pisa. According to the story, it was observing the slow swing of a chandelier in the cathedral, during mass, that made him think about it.

    People have these ideas about the Leaning Tower of Pisa that seem impossible to eradicate. According to one, Galileo is supposed to have dropped balls from the top to demonstrate the independence of the acceleration due to gravity from the mass of the object accelerated. But this seems to be apocryphal. It would be a lousy way to test the hypothesis, since everything happens so fast. He would have used an inclined plane and rolled them down the slope, thus diluting the acceleration sufficiently to be able to show conclusively that they took the same time irrespective of mass. But it seems the independence of acceleration due to gravity from mass had already been described by John of Alexandria in the c.6th and that Galileo was aware of this.
     
  8. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    I can imagine he might have been explaining to someone "Look, if I drop two different-weight objects from the tower of Pisa..." and that got embellished by people to him having done so.
    Ha! I was about to say that I thought it was originally Philoponus who formulated the law, and then realised it's the same person! Never twigged that they were the same! My bad!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
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  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Actually, I was reflecting there is in fact one confounding issue with balls rolling down an inclined plane, which is that if they are not the same size they will acquire different amounts of angular momentum and kinetic energy as they roll faster and faster. This will exert a braking effect on their linear acceleration down the slope. The moment of inertia (2/5 mr² for a solid sphere) goes up linearly with mass but with the square of the radius, so a big heavy ball will roll down the slope more slowly than a smaller one!

    Galileo could eliminate the effect by making balls the same size out of different materials (wood and lead, say). Although the moment of inertia of the lead one would still be greater, due to the greater mass, so too would the torque making it roll, as this will be proportional to the force of gravity acting on the centre of mass. So that should cancel out. I think......
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2022
  10. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

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    That's not what I read, It was the slant in the ceiling that made the pivot of the chandelier swing for a long time as opposed to something hanging from a well balanced ceiling. That's why I think a pendulum can draw energy in. It's kind of like a slide for energy that travels through the pendulum and out again unless you store the energy. Drawing pain out of the musculoskeletal system through the tailbone area, or just putting something hot or cold on your tailbone area, might alleviate pain, there isn't a lot out there to help people with pain. Arthritis isn't well treated at all.
     
  11. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    ..............[click]..................
     
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    No you don't. You're not fooling anyone. You're just trolling.

    I post this, not for your benefit, but the for benefit of other, future readers, who may stumble upon this while Googling for relief from arthritis pain.

    And you're here, making the world a slightly worse place to be. Shame.
     
  13. trevor borocz johnson Registered Senior Member

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    Me ma just tried an ice pack on her tailbone and says her back and knee hurt less. Better to trust those close to you then internet flamers.
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yes. Nothing to do with pendulums, and certainly take no help from internet snake oil floggers.

    You mock the pain of others. You're making the world a worse place with your disinformation.
     
  15. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Please cite the source you read.
    How could it?

    Clearly, whatever you read is hopelessly wrong. That's if you're not just making this up.
    Energy is not a thing that can be drawn in.
    What is like a slide? You make no sense.
    What makes you think it might do that? How is the pain drawn out? How can something like pain be "drawn out"? What does that even mean?
    Are you a medical professional? Is this your professional opinion, then?
     

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