Ozone hole over the Arctic

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by sculptor, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    7,221
    We have been blessed by a strong polar vortex this winter which has kept mid latitude winter temperatures mild.
    https://earth.nullschool.net/#curre...thographic=-89.60,81.75,381/loc=53.607,89.749
    Unfortunately:
    That has led to a hole in the ozone layer over the arctic

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    Cold temperatures and a strong polar vortex allowed chemicals to gnaw away at the protective ozone layer in the north.
    There was more cold air above the Arctic than in any winter recorded since 1979, says Markus Rex, an atmospheric scientist at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Potsdam, Germany.

    In the chilly temperatures, the high-altitude clouds formed, and the ozone-destroying reactions began.

    How about that?
     
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  3. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, how about that? Is this issue not the very same man made problem as climate change? I noticed you didn't actually post the article which has the relevant information. How convenient.

    Chemicals, including chlorine and bromine, which come from refrigerants and other industrial sources
    , trigger reactions on the surfaces of those clouds that chew away at the ozone layer.

    Things would have been much worse this year if nations had not come together in 1987 to pass the Montreal Protocol, the international treaty that phases out the use of ozone-depleting chemicals, says Paul Newman, an atmospheric scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Antarctic ozone hole is now on its way to recovery — last year’s hole was the smallest on record — but it will take decades for the chemicals to completely disappear from the atmosphere.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00904-w
     
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  5. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    one wonders
    Will all that chlorine being sprayed over everything in combating the coronavirus find it's way up into the stratosphere?
     
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  7. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    Chlorine is reactive and tends to break down quickly while CFC's are stable molecules and break down slowly so they can reach the upper atmosphere.
     
  8. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    and yet, we have
    Chemicals, including chlorine ... trigger reactions on the surfaces of those clouds that chew away at the ozone layer.
     
  9. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    No, not chlorine, CFC's.
     
  10. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Instead of wondering, one could do a bit of research.
    The answer is "no". Check it out.
     
  11. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    and then we have,
    from Q's post #2 above
    Chemicals, including chlorine ... trigger reactions on the surfaces of those clouds that chew away at the ozone layer.
     
  12. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    20,834
    Are you just pretending to be willfully ignorant?

    They're called CFC's (Chlorofluorocarbons) and HCFC's ( hydrochlorofluorocarbons) which are made up of various chemicals that when combined create stable molecules allowing them to reach and remain in the atmosphere over time such that some of the chemicals within the molecule (Chlorine) are able to chew away at the ozone layer. Chlorine on its own breaks down before it can even reach the atmosphere, so it can't eat away at the it. Is this clear yet or are you going to continue demonstrating willful ignorance?
     

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