Particles near black holes

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by RoccoR, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. pmb Banned Banned

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    I agree. Energy is in fact a source of gravity so if that was squeezed out then you’d also be squeezing out the gravity source as well.

    It’s a common misconception that the uncertainty principle allows for that. Most people/authors/physicists misread the so-called time-energy uncertainty principle. In fact it’s not really an uncertainty principle in the normal sense since it doesn’t give a relationship between two uncertainties since the delta t isn’t an uncertainty but a time interval. See http://home.comcast.net/~peter.m.brown/qm/time_energy_hup.htm
     
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  3. arfa brane call me arf Valued Senior Member

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    Isn't it the usual reason given for virtual particles, where the delta t is the very short existence that is "allowed", and the delta E is explained as energy "borrowed from" the vacuum? I've also seen virtual particles explained as amplitudes of half-waves, so that there are no full-waves.
     
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  5. pmb Banned Banned

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    Yes. It's a very popular reason. It also happens to be wrong. Griffiths explains this on page 51-52 in his text Introduction to Elementary Particles. It's too long to quote though buy he concludes
    He comments regarding the time-energy uncertainty principle.
    Lol!!
     
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  7. Trapped Banned Banned

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    I'm having trouble with the bolded part.

    How can you not have an uncertainty in the time? You say it is a time interval, but you say \(\Delta t\) is not an uncertainty. But what if you know \(\Delta E\) to a high precision wouldn't that conclude an uncertainty in the time interval?

    I know that \(\Delta E \Delta t\) aren't true complementary observables, simply because time is not an observable.
     

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