Patent Found for Human Identification Scheme

Discussion in 'Religion Archives' started by Searcher, Nov 29, 1999.

  1. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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  3. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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    This is just too much - I looked up the phone number for Thomas W. Heeter in Houston, Texas, the guy who applied for the patent - and I found 3 different phone numbers. The third number I found was (713)666-3548. Strange coincidence, huh?

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  5. Oxygen One Hissy Kitty Registered Senior Member

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    Great! You're telling me the anti-Christ is a Texan? We're in for it now!

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    That was pretty interesting. Might our own "666" be the mysterious Thomas W. Heeter?

    There is a bit of a drawback to the tattooing method. As we age, our skin changes to grow with us. There are no old tattoos that are as clear as the day they were penned. I wonder if his system accounts for that? Subdermal implants would be the way I would go.
     
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  7. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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    Oxygen,

    That reminds me of a joke...

    Once upon a time there lived three men: a doctor, a chemist, and an engineer. For some reason all three offended the king
    and were sentenced to die on the same day.

    The day of the execution arrived, and the doctor was led up to the guillotine. As he strapped the doctor to the guillotine, the executioner asked, "Head up or head down?"

    "Head up," said the doctor.

    "Blindfold or no blindfold?"

    "No blindfold."

    So the executioner raised the axe, and z-z-z-z-ing! Down came the blade--and stopped barely an inch above the doctor's neck.

    Well, the law stated that if an execution didn't succeed the first time the prisoner had to be released, so the doctor was set free.

    Then the chemist was led up to the guillotine.

    "Head up or head down?" said the executioner.

    "Head up."

    "Blindfold or no blindfold?"

    "No blindfold."

    So the executioner raised his axe, and z-z-z-z-ing! Down came the blade--and stopped an inch above the chemist's neck. Well, the law stated that if the execution didn't succeed the first time the prisoner had to be released, so the chemist was set free.

    Finally the engineer was led up to the guillotine.

    "Head up or head down?"

    "Head up."

    "Blindfold or no blindfold?"

    "No blindfold."

    So the executioner raised his axe, but before he could cut the rope, the engineer yelled out, "WAIT! I see what the problem is!"

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  8. 666 Registered Senior Member

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    Searcher,

    That was pretty good! I liked it a lot!

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    The Belief that there is only one truth and that oneself is in possession of it
    seems to me the depest root of all evil that is in the world
    -Max Born
     
  9. SkyeBlue Registered Senior Member

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    Hmm, does this remind anyone else of the serial numbers some of the Jews were tattoed with by the Nazis?

    I have to agree that a bar code wouldn't work very well. And what would stop criminals from making fake tattoos? A bar code is just a serial number, find out that serial number and grab yourself a Sharpie (permanent marker) and drawing a duplicate bar code wouldn't be TOO hard. And I am sure that there are lots and lots of people that would never get it done - would you? Pretty much a waste of a patent number, if you ask me.

    Subdermal implants would definitely work better, and would probably be less painful to implant and more difficult to forge. But, all that isn't necessary anyway. A retina scan is quick and easy to perform and I hear our retinas are more individualistic that fingerprints are! Plus, you don't have to try to convince 50 year-old ladies to get bar codes tattooed on their butts.

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    (I just have this mental image of the grocery store checker swiping all the groceries over the scanner, then grabbing this old lady off the belt and scanning her too... heh, heh.)
     
  10. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Two cents worth on bio-ID.

    I saw a TLC-network program recently where they described the bioidentification system to be put into place in the UK. Whereas the monitoring system is so thick that authorities can allegedly know when a specific person, say, leaves the London city limits, the system is nowhere near full strength. The described system includes ID data from the eye, from DNA, and from fingerprints. Here's the scary part--the show's producers allege that refusing or delaying your enrollment in the program is cause for criminal suspicion and investigation. If anyone has any better facts or perspective on this one, I'd love to hear it.

    Also, I wanted to point out the one thing I haven't been able to figure out about barcode/subdural identification. Namely, it seems that in this country, we have a certain amount of control over our physical selves. Now, excepting political hot-potatoes such as abortion (whose body are we controlling?) or suicide (no choice on the inbound, no choice on the outbound) ... where do we draw the lines about our bodies? e.g.--

    * It seems that there is no legal device in place to force American human beings without criminal conviction to alter their body to meet legal standards; therefore, a tattoo or subdural microchip would seem to infringe on that priciple, should acquiescence be the only means to maintain one's station in common society.

    thanx,
    Tiassa

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    "Let us not launch the boat until the ground is wet." (Khaavren of Castlerock)
     
  11. SkyeBlue Registered Senior Member

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    Yah, Tiassa, I don't see Americans voluntarily getting barcodes, serial numbers, or anything else permanently implanted in or on their bodies. Maybe you'd get a few volunteers, but I think the majority of people would stay clear of anything like this. I know I sure would!!
     
  12. tablariddim forexU2 Valued Senior Member

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    They would prefer to use the present barcode technology, because it's ubiquitous and it's cheap.I don't think the tattoos would be easy to reproduce with marker pens because they would obviously have intricate, one off, individual designs.
    If credit companies take up this system and begin to offer it as an alternative to plastic, probably with incentives and extra benefits it probably won't be long before it's fully accepted by the public (1-2 generations?).
    Wrinkled skin wouldn't be a problem because they could use temporary invisible ink and renew the tattoo every few years.

    Realistically, I see this as just the next logical step in the progression towards the total electronic classification and control, which will culminate with the arrival of the totally cashless society.
    Because, once people get accustomed to having their bodies marked for the sake of financial expedience (!?) then they would easier go the whole hog and will want all of their plastic numbers tattooed, you know, like id cards, student cards, social security numbers etc etc.
    But then someone will say, 'Hey wait! why walk around with a zillion tattoo's, when we can make all of your earthly information accessible with just one tattoo?' (or, by that time) 'just one teensy weensy little subdural?' and well, there you go.Total!

    I'm not paranoid, though it's a funk scenario.
    Yet I can see it, clear as day.
     
  13. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

    Messages:
    36,614
    Regarding barcodes .... Has anyone seen the circular dot-code used by United Parcel Service?

    Tab makes a good point, though. Once people become accustomed to having their bodies marked, the whole issue becomes incredibly difficult. Consider the internet tool "cookie". Imagine: the government wants to survey your computer storage, your web transactions, and your software registrations. No warrant, no cause. Can't do that? How are you going to argue against the government reading and writing data from your hard drive? They already have the cookie-precedent. Once private citizens allow it, the government gets to do it, too. That may be a long stretch, I admit. But we hear the same "where will it stop" arguments about speech & religion, guns, taxes, ad nauseum.

    Some thoughts on automated identification standards:

    * In Singapore, you have barcodes placed strategically on your car so that roadside scanners can read them. If you are so privileged as to have a car, and if you drive that car into the wrong part of the city (as dictated by your barcodes) you lose your driving privileges and face stiff financial penalties, if not prison.

    * Will you be able to stylize your serial number? Maybe a Christian will want a fish around their barcode (I'm not being ironic here); or an accountant's number engraved on the dial of a combination-safe tattoo; or a mechanic's number etched into a wrench-design or a musclecar tattoo?

    * Will your barcode be private property? Or, like all else where your name is written down, will it be for sale to whoever wants to spam you silly with unnecessary commerce?

    * Will your barcode be the only method of interacting with society?

    * How much of the annual governmental effort will be spent administrating data collection and management?

    * Will severe protests against a barcode involve removal of one's hand (or stained extremity), or will that young generation find a new reason for scarification?

    Funny ... I thought we invented currency for the same reasons we invented other things--to assist us in the passage of our lives. I have yet to hear a justification for barcodes/subdural chips that demonstrates how their benefits will outweigh the rest. If I might be ... extreme ... (TS?) ... let me simply say that I suppose it does simplify life, if all there is to life is shopping at Nordstrom's and day-trading.

    thanx,
    Tiassa

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    "Let us not launch the boat until the ground is wet." (Khaavren of Castlerock)
     
  14. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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  15. tablariddim forexU2 Valued Senior Member

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    There are some very important reasons why the government would prefer a cashless society and would benefit from this barcode system.
    Think about it, no cash = no tax evasion,the eradication of most cash oriented crimes, no credit fraud etc.The implications are actually pretty awesome, enough to change the world?
     
  16. FyreStar Faithless since 1980 Registered Senior Member

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    Searcher -

    Heh, that was good for a laugh, alright. Its amazing the kind of things some people will actually devote their time to. Barcode beast indeed!

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    FyreStar
     
  17. Corp.Hudson Registered Senior Member

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    I would like to see the author of that webpage have his program analyze a dictionary, and see what words he finds demonic. It isn't very scientific to type in only phrases that support your point.

    FYI: The number 666 comes from the Hebrew alphabet, which, like the chaldeans, doubled numbers and letters. If you add up the letters in Emperor Nero you get 666. Emperor Nero was the biggest persecutor of christians, hence his name being that of satans beast.
     
  18. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Corp. Hudson ....

    I have several friends who describe themselves as having "escaped" the Seventh-Day Adventist church. Frankly, I think it's more a humorous term than anything, but some of the material they brought with them amazes me.

    Relevant to the present topic are several books that one of my friends' parents bought for her regarding the Coming of the Beast. Barcodes, microchips, the whole shmoo. But among the more harmless of the books' observations was that, apparently, the words ANGUS VICAR DEI, inscribed somewhere on the Pope's throne, also equal 666. This apparently motivates some Seventh-Day Adventists to believe the Pope is Satan.

    thanx,
    Tiassa

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    "Let us not launch the boat until the ground is wet." (Khaavren of Castlerock)
     
  19. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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    651
    Tiassa,

    I think the 7th Day Adventists believe that the Antichrist will turn out to be a Pope (whether this one or a future Pope). This comes from Revelations Chapter 17, which talks about the "woman drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus", who really represents a city that sits on 7 hills (Rome). The "woman" has written upon her forehead, "MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH". The Catholic Church is basically a rebirth of the mystery religions of Babylon. The Antichrist is supposed to come from Rome.

    As for the phrase "ANGUS VICAR DEI" adding up to 666 - they are using the letters that are also Roman numerals, conveniently counting the U as a V, and adding the value of only those letters to equal 666. However, I believe there is an "L" missing somewhere (I'm not sure of the exact phrase myself, but I've heard this one before).


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  20. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Searcher ....

    Thanx for the clarity. When it's out that far it seems really strange to me and I sometimes forget the details.

    thanx
    Tiassa

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    "Let us not launch the boat until the ground is wet." (Khaavren of Castlerock)
     
  21. Searcher Registered Senior Member

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    Here's another item of interest, again from Houston, Texas:

    http://www.techweb.com/wire/story/TWB19990514S0024

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  22. DaveW Registered Senior Member

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    I personally think that DNA-identification technology will become the standard, simply because there is no way to circumvent it. Additionally, there are now microchip-sized DNA-sequencers that can analyze a genome in very little time using very small amounts of DNA sample. Even cost is reasonable ($6 per chip), even though they haven't entered mass production (which would drive the price down considerably).

    For more info, read this press release: http://www.umich.edu/~newsinfo/Releases/1998/Oct98/r102198b.html

    Or do a search on the web for "lab on a chip"

    Dave
     

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