Remember Pearl Harbor.

Discussion in 'History' started by mathman, Dec 7, 2021.

  1. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    80th anniversary. Do people remember?
     
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  3. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    90 year old + people ?


    caught with their pants down
    a massively successful battle
    which started a war that was un-winnable

    however in the years after
    both sides have become allies & critical trade partners
    who now help define the construct of modern civility
     
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  5. origin Heading towards oblivion Valued Senior Member

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    Doesn't mean much to me it was before my time.
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    It's not an anniversary that I mark on my calendar, nor was I around. I have been to the Pearl Harbor Memorial, I've read a book by a reporter that was there on that day and I rented and flew a small airplane around Oahu and got a sense of the terrain that they followed.

    So, it is an event that sticks in my mind but I rarely know when the anniversary is.
     
  8. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    5,028
    No. It's like the Alamo: people hear a slogan, are taught a date; understand the reference. It doesn't mean anything to them personally, and very, very few have taken the trouble to learn the why's and wherefore's, antecedents and sequelae of the event. It's just another one of those national monuments.
     
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  9. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Most people do probably know more about Pearl Harbor than the Alamo however...

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  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Also, it's American.
     
  11. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    I wouldn't count on it.
     
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  12. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    I was 12 at that time.
     
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  13. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    the response by fire bombing tokyo was a bit risky
    launching bombers from carriers
    brilliant idea

    had the Japanese command not been divided
    (Pearl Harbor attack)

    A the attack would not have happened
    B They would have launched an invasion directly afterward which would have been quite full on
    it had a lot of luck go their way

    the response to pearl habour was
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Tokyo_(10_March_1945)



    devastating response
    made its point
    changed the coarse of supply issue
    & bent the japanese will enough to start to undermine the support for their own troops
    but they had limited contact to front line troops from home

    nuclear bombing of japan ...
    the next step
    it got them to surrender
    so its a win for both sides of those who survived


    why the usa carried this civilian targeting into Vietnam & Korea i dont know
    seems archaic & was clearly counter productive
    usa was is own worst enemy by targeting civilians in Vietnam & Korean wars


    i hope commemorations like pearl harbour are used to remind the modern civilized human why war is the most undesirable outcome of situations
    all hat litigious nonsense is not helpful
    trying to sue governments for damages
    but that reality & morality still exists today & is constantly validated
    modern society needs to move on to he next evolutionary step

    but global rise in nationalism &
    middle eastern/south american/african/south east asian

    financial & political & religious refugees in the millions
    bringing disease & crime & drugs & terrorism over borders
    giving more strength & validation to increase nationalism

    • how many of those refugees support equal rights for women girls & LGBTQ+ ?
    • less than 5% ?
    makes things considerably more difficult

    look at Canada & their native Indian internment camps for children where they committed genocide
    consciously purposefully & 100% aware
    with an intended goal
    & the canadians seem to be divided on a response
    as if genocide is perfectly ok
    crazy
    but real & how modern people think


    Soo in summery

    i think all of these war commemorations are equally important
    be it Hiroshima day
    tea wars
    WW2 battles
    etc etc
    the over riding goal is that good must prevail over all outcomes
    & we must learn from it & adapt & become better than before
    & to not forget those who have sacrificed EVERYTHING to make that happen
    regardless of which side their ancestors were on

    all should be respected
    all should learn from these

     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2021
  14. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    remember

    NO
     
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Canadians are unanimous that this is not OK.
     
  16. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Whole lotta statues getting toppled.
     
  17. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    that's good
    i hope there is some solid money to be paid out to the victims & their family's

    money talks
     
  18. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    The Doolittle Raid wasn't strictly speaking a fire raid. The majority of bombs were HE. The fire raids were later on when the B-29s could reach Tokyo from land bases.

    (I recently watched Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo and both versions of Midway, 1976 and 2019.)
     
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