Share About Your Ancestry

Discussion in 'About the Members' started by mmatt9876, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    That is great!
     
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  3. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    most half decent ancestry societys do everything by hand written(or typed) [physical]letter.
    it removes the vast majority of the crazy from the bathwater so the baby doesnt get thrown out.
     
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  5. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    Going back to the discussion between me and exchemist were having was the disagreement between Protestants and Catholics during that time in history purely religious or were their political or racial undertones also.

    Did the Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh all get along over the hundreds of years of each peoples existence and business, and did they especially get along during this time of Protestant dominance, if that is the correct term, in Ireland that me and exchemist were discussing about. Have religious and political relations between the Irish, Scottish, English, and Welsh improved since then if there ever was a problem? Does the future look bright for these peoples religious and political relations?

    I know exchemist said the relations between Protestants and Catholic has improved since then but the state of things could be upset by Brexit.
     
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  7. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    One good thing about Ireland ,with respect to tracing genealogy, is the naming conventions used for both males and females.

    The first son was named after the fathers father
    The second son was named after the mothers father
    The third son was named after the father
    The fourth son was named after the fathers eldest brother etc as long as that name had not been used previously.

    The female naming convention is similar.

    So if you had the names and birth order/year of a family you also had a very good idea of the grandparents names even if there were no records available.

    There were some exceptions to this rule as I noticed with my own family as male children born around 1791, who should have been named Brian, were actually named Patrick in honor of Patrick Sarsfeld on the centenary of the siege of Limerick in 1691. My family name is not Sarsfeld and using names from other branches of the same family when that person was not a direct ancestor, let alone from an unrelated family altogether, was usually frowned on.
     
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  8. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    I did not know that. Thanks for sharing.
     
  9. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    In my father's family, it used to be traditional to name the first son after the grandfather:
    Great-grandfather: Peter
    Grandfather: John
    Father: Peter
    Son: John
    etc.​
    I think it was a nice tradition, though the downside was that most of our ancestors were named Jacob.

    But my father broke the tradition and gave my oldest brother a different name. He did, however, get our maternal grandfather's name for a middle name.
     
  10. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    Naming traditions can be interesting. In Denmark, it used to be that the son's surname came from the father's first name. Thus if Hans had a son named Christian, he would be Christian Hansen, and if Christian had a son named Lars, he would be Lars Christiansen. Any children Lars had would have the surname Larsen.

    Whereas in Finland, it was the middle name that was derived from the Father's name, Thus all of Pauli's sons would have the middle name "Paulinpoika" ("Pauli's boy", while daughters would have the middle name Paulintytar). Surnames, depending on what region you lived in, were not always considered that important, and could change from generation, or even over a person's lifetime (many times surnames were taken from the homestead, and if you moved, you changed your surname).
    Thus while my grandfather's middle name was taken from his father's name, my grandfather changed his surname both before immigrating to the US and then again afterwards (shortening it). With my dad, he broke with tradition completely by not even giving him a middle name. My middle name is taken from my paternal grandfather.
     
  11. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    Going back several generations most of my family members were Americans so most of my family members had English or Christian first names.
     
  12. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    I thought I would share a few family surnames of mine if anyone is interested. Some of my ancestors surnames include Meyer, Rozanski, Colfer, Kelly, and Hesse. I believe my Meyer ancestors are German, my Rozanski ancestors are Polish, my Colfer ancestors are Irish, my Kelly ancestors are Irish, and my Hesse ancestors are German.
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    My Müller ancestors were from West Prussia, which is now part of Poland. Some of their descendants of my generation spell it Muller in English and some of them spell it Miller. We have other distant relatives with Polish names but German ancestry.
     
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  14. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    I'm Iranian and Italian.
     
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  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    5 gens Canadian. Irish ancestry. Boring.
     
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  16. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    Since my first post in this thread, I have been able to re-evaluate some of the information by pushing things back a few more generations. Scratch the Russian and Danish. It turns out that those branches actually originated in Germany. The Denmark birth was by during a "stop-over" during a immigration from Germany to Sweden. The Russia births were in a region which at the time was called Ingermanland, just south of present day Finland, and was under Swedish rule at the time, having been seized during one of the wars between Sweden and Russia. My ancestors born there were German who had immigrated to Sweden and then got there as part of the military occupation and then settled there. Later, when Russia retook that territory, they relocated to Finland. There, they basically kept to marriages with other German families that were in Finland via Sweden for a couple of generations, Then a marriage to a Swedish military officer, who's granddaughter married into maternal Grandmother's Finnish branch of the family.
    An interesting tidbit from all this is that it turns out that At least one of those German branches was from a Noble German family, which led to it being considered "Finnish Nobility" during those years it was in Finland. This jives with something my mother once told me about a rumor of "Finnish Royality" in our past. Being as Finland was never a sovereign monarchy, this was not likely, but it easy to see how "Nobility" became " Royality" in the retelling. I never put much stock in that tale, as such stories are often fabricated, but there now seems to be some kernel of truth behind it.

    Since my wife is 1/4 German, I thought I'd look to see if there was any possibility of any co-mingling with my German ancestors. As it turns out, all her ancestors of record where from a region near Stuttgart, in Southern Germany, while mine all originate in Northern Germany (which is likely why they tended to immigrate North to Sweden). I also have one ancestral branch that leads to France in the 1400's. One of those ancestors took a wife in Gemany and settled there ( in Muelhausen, which is just about smack in the middle of Germany) He would have been my 12th Great-grandfather. Which, unless I miscalculated, would make me 0.012% French (At least in terms of ancestry. After that many generations, I an unlikely to inherited anything from him genetically)
     
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  17. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Family from Ireland, lived in the U.S. from shortly after the Revolutionary War on. All in North Carolina until I moved.
     
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  18. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    Poland used to be part of the German Empire before the end of World War 1, right? Was Austria Hungarians a German people? Are Polish people considered German or Slavic?
     
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Poland was partitioned three times between Germany, Austria-Hungary and Russia. After the third partion there was nothing left until after WWI. The Polish people are Slavic, more closely related to the Russians than to the Germans. But because the borders shifted a lot, there was a lot of mixing.

    And I didn't tell you the punch-line: All four of my grandparents were born in Ukraine but none of them were Ukranian.
     
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  20. gmilam Valued Senior Member

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    5th generation Texan. When my ancestors moved here, Texas was part of Mexico. But my dad has traced his side of the genepool back to Scotland. And he's traced my mom's side back to Ireland. DNA tests on both my parents has us firmly based in the British Isles, with a little Dutch and Spanish thrown in for flavor.
     
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  21. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

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    The state of Prussia once existed where the state of Germany and the state of Poland now exist, right? I know Prussia was conquered by Napoleon at one point. I wonder if Germany and Poland have some French roots or influences too?

    What nationalities were your four grandparents born in the Ukraine? Why were they born in Ukraine if they were not Ukrainian?
     
  22. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    On my father's side:
    My great(x12) grandfather on my father's side was sold into bondage after the americas after participating on (and becoming a POW) the wrong side in a united kingdom religious (civil) war.
    (What was he thinking?)
     
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  23. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    I have a suspicion that those ancestors of mine that originated in Germany and ended up in Sweden/Finland did so for religious reasons also. Looking at the dates, the period during which they left was marked with tensions caused by Protestantism becoming prevalent in the North half of the country.
     
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