Supermassive blackhole creating stars

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by sculptor, Nov 28, 2019.

  1. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    Supermassive blackhole creating stars at a ‘furious rate’ found
    NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope have found a supermassive blackhole 5.8 billion light years from Earth that is creating stars at a “furious rate”.
     
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  3. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    How does it work?
     
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  5. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    I'm also interested to find out. It's been a while since the opening post, though.
     
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    I don't remember all the details but they found a supermassive black hole that was weaker than many others. The heat generated from black holes ejecting particles keeps the gas too hot to generate new stars.

    This black hole was weaker so the gas was cooler. Cool enough to start generating massive amounts of stars.

    The article I read indicated that this was a temporary thing (I don't know what kind of time frame we are talking about here) and that at a certain point the black hole would become stronger, the gas would become hotter and this would stop the new star formation.
     
  8. dumbest man on earth Real Eyes Realize Real Lies Valued Senior Member

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    - https://www.express.co.uk/news/scie...ars-hubble-telescope-galaxies-new-discoveries

    "NASA shock discovery: Supermassive blackhole creating stars at a ‘furious rate’ found
    NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope have found a supermassive blackhole 5.8 billion light years from Earth that is creating stars at a “furious rate”.
    Galaxy clusters typically consist of thousands of galaxies held together by strong gravitational forces, with the most powerful black holes ever discovered lying at their centres. In the usual galaxy clusters observed the black holes at their centres were so strong they actually prevented the creation of stars, but the “phoenix cluster” just discovered boasts some key differences that have shocked scientists. The new cluster’s black hole seems far weaker than in other clusters’ with trillions of sun’s masses worth of hot gas cooling around it, allowing the formation of a vast number of stars.
    If stronger, the black hole at its centre would prevent this cooling and therefore prevent any creation of stars, but these unique circumstances may provide scientists with some answers to some of the greatest questions ever put to them.
    The research could help us better understand the life cycles of galaxies and how they interact with these supermassive blackholes.
    A paper published in the Astrophysical Journal last month, explained the processes in these clusters in some easier terms. "Imagine running an air-conditioner in your house on a hot day, but then starting a wood fire. Your living room can’t properly cool down until you put out the fire,” co-author Brian McNamara from the University of Waterloo, Canada, said in a statement.
    “Similarly, when a black hole’s heating ability is turned off in a galaxy cluster, the gas can then cool.”
    They found that in the “phoenix cluster” the hot gas was cooling at the same rate as when a blackhole stops injecting energy.
    This means stars can be born in the region in huge numbers where the gas has cooled sufficiently.
    The X-ray Chandra Observatory noting that the cluster was producing stars at an eye watering 500 times faster than our own Milky Way galaxy.
    However, the authors of the report stressed this “furious rate” won’t last forever.
    “These results show that the black hole has temporarily been assisting in the formation of stars, but when it strengthens its effects will start to mimic those of black holes in other clusters, stifling more star birth,” co-author Mark Voit from Michigan State University said in the statement."

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    https://www.express.co.uk/news/scie...ars-hubble-telescope-galaxies-new-discoveries

     

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