To what extent is evidence important in philosophy?

Discussion in 'General Philosophy' started by DaveC426913, Jan 7, 2017.

  1. Syne Sine qua non Valued Senior Member

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    Does skepticism require a competing claim?

    Which physicalist solution to the problem of mental causation do you subscribe to?
     
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  3. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    The following [2] points from a previous reputable link, shows exactly what a silly fallacy is being so arrogantly, pretentiously and of course ignorantly pushed here.................
    http://selfconsciousmind.com/introduction.html
    1. How can mind-brain interaction occur? There is no conceivable mechanism whereby a totally non-physical mind could affect the material body. If the mind and body are totally different types of things, how can they intermingle and interact with each other? Response: The mind is not totally non-physical. It is non-material, but has the character of a structured energy field that interacts with physical processes. The evidence supporting this view, presented earlier, includes phenomena from NDEs and from phantom limb interactions. In addition, see the following section on “Interaction of the non-material mind with physical processes”.
    2. How does brain injury also impair the non-physical mind? When the brain is damaged in some way, mental faculties are always compromised or impaired to some degree. If the mind is a completely separate substance from the brain, how does brain injury also impair the mind? (Churchland, 1988). Response: The mind is not a completely separate substance from the brain. It has the character of a structured energy field that interacts with physical processes, in particular with neurons. Impairment is due to interference with the interface between the neurons and the corresponding structures of the mind.
     
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  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    You can't be serious.

    You seriously can't be serious.
     
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  7. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    The amazing phenomena of terminal lucidity should also be mentioned. This is where dying patients with severe brain disorders like dementia, coma, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's suddenly become totally lucid and converse with their relatives for awhile right before dying. If the brain was the mind, this shouldn't be able to happen. Indeed, that the interface itself can be overridden like this is simply miraculous.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20010032
     
  8. Syne Sine qua non Valued Senior Member

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    That's misquoted. I didn't say any of that.
     
  9. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    You did. They're not your words, but you posted the words as an argument in this thread.

    What you're trying to say with them is a bit ambiguous. I have drawn attention to what I consider the crux of the points.

    Why don't you tell us what your point is in posting this here?

    That phantom limbs are evidence of the mind as a "structured energy field"?
     
  10. Syne Sine qua non Valued Senior Member

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    3,064
    Liar. Where? Show us!

    paddoboy posted it twice:
    http://www.sciforums.com/threads/to...tant-in-philosophy.158582/page-5#post-3428466

    http://www.sciforums.com/threads/to...tant-in-philosophy.158582/page-8#post-3429026
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017 at 2:54 AM
  11. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Not real sure what you are on about, but I doubt anyone else is either, including yourself, other then to be contrary and pretentious.

    What the hell does that prove?
    The brain does have the ability to repair itself you know in certain circumstances.
    http://lghealthhub.org/Brain-Spine-Health/Can-a-brain-heal-itself-after-a-stroke
    When a stroke deprives the brain of blood, the nerve cells in the brain are either damaged or die, causing the physical and mental changes typical of stroke. Now, research is telling us that the brain is a fighter and does try to heal itself.

    What is a stroke?

    Stroke occurs when blood vessels feeding the brain are either blocked or leak (hemorrhage), depriving the brain of blood and starving it of the oxygen that brain cells need to survive. Damage or death to nerve cells in the brain occurs, resulting in the physical and mental changes that stroke victims experience.

    Not long ago, it was thought that the brain had little ability to repair itself following stroke. We know, however, that individuals can and do regain function. There is an increasing amount of research indicating that the brain is a fighter when damaged and does attempt to heal itself.

    How does the brain heal?

    We now know that the brain has the ability to change over its lifetime. So the question arises: Can the brain repair itself after a stroke? And if so, how?

    The initial recovery following stroke is most likely due to decreased swelling of brain tissue, removal of toxins from the brain, and improvement in the circulation of blood in the brain. Cells damaged, but not beyond repair, will begin to heal and function more normally. Rehabilitation therapies stimulate sprouting of existing nerve cells, causing them to make connections to other nerve cells. The brain can recruit surviving parts to take over the functions of the damaged areas.

    The brain can create new nerve cells

    Neuroscientists previously believed that the brain cells you were born with would be the only ones you would ever have. More recent research also suggests that the brain may actually create new nerve cells through a process called neurogenesis. Stem-cell research is now under way to see if this new nerve-cell growth can be maximized and directed toward the most damaged areas of the brain.

    An early start yields the best outcomes

    There is hope for recovery following stroke. Even elderly and ill individuals who suffer a stroke can improve. The best outcomes occur when rehabilitation, including physical, occupational, and speech therapies, is started early. Early rehabilitation can also prevent greater disability that otherwise often occurs in individuals who fail to obtain treatment shortly after their stroke.

    While the greatest recovery is likely to occur within the first few months following stroke, continued gains can occur over a much longer duration, even throughout the stroke patient’s lifetime.

    For more information on stroke risk factors, prevention, and how to spot a stroke FAST, go to www.lghealth.org/stroke.
    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<


    Again all you are pushing is unsupported philosophical agenda laden nonsense.
    The facts are without a brain, or being brain dead, means one thing....Total zero consciousness and zero mind.
     
  12. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    What does healing over a long period of time from a stroke have to do with terminal lucidity, which happens all at once and involves comas, dementia, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's ?
     
  13. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Apologies. I screwed up.

    My quote wires must have gotten crossed somewhere. I did not see that I actually quoted paddoboy, but for some reason, it added the reference to you.

    I am going to ask moderation to strike posts 143 through 147, as they will just mess up anyone trying to follow along.
     
  14. Syne Sine qua non Valued Senior Member

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    Then maybe you'd like to show us where, on this whole forum, those quotes exist...other than in your posts.
     
  15. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    http://homepages.wmich.edu/~baldner/carruthers.pdf

    “The Mind is the Brain”


    The Identity Theory • The Identity Theory rejects Dualism, and is a form of Materialism. • It claims that everything that exists is, ultimately, material. • The identity theory accepts that mental states are, in some sense, “real.” • But it claims that what they really are are states of brain and/or central nervous system.
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    pad, I screwed up the quote in post 143. All subsequent posts till 147 are my fault.
    I'm not sure what should happen with post 148, which is, at least in part, due to the mixup.
     
  17. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    No probs....

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  18. Kittamaru War Doctor Staff Member

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    Mod Hat:
    It has been requested that DaveC's misquote, and the subsequent discussion, be struck to prevent future confusion in the thread - this would include posts 143, 145, 146, 147, part of 148, 150, 151, 152, and 153. Given that DaveC426913 has admitted his mistake and already apologized for it, are there any objections to this?
     
    paddoboy, Syne and DaveC426913 like this.
  19. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Done the same thing myself on at least three occasions, and wouldn't have noticed until notified by the person to whom the mistaken quote was attributed: All done in good grace!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  20. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    How the hell do you know over how long the healing has/was in operation for?
     
  21. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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  22. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    http://homepages.wmich.edu/~baldner/carruthers.pdf

    “The Mind is the Brain”


    The Identity Theory • The Identity Theory rejects Dualism, and is a form of Materialism. • It claims that everything that exists is, ultimately, material. • The identity theory accepts that mental states are, in some sense, “real.” • But it claims that what they really are are states of brain and/or central nervous system.
     

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