what happens if?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Beaconator, Mar 13, 2019.

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  1. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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  3. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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  5. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Apparently it is quite easy as far as experiments are concerned. No extra-special environmental requirements. You can practically do it on the beach.
     
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  7. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Aren't colleges interested I having the equipment to isolate chemical elements?

    And wouldn't everyone like to see what happens when they are in the same box without using a computer to do so?
     
  8. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    They already have equipment to do that.

    No, we already know.
     
  9. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    what colour is the box ?
     
  10. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    I believe that. But not where I go to school there isn't
    No you dont.
     
  11. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Silver. Because it's made of iron.
     
  12. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    i still think i do not understand your thread question. though im following out of curiosity.
     
  13. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    What does your belief system tell you happens when all the chemical elements are put in the same box?
     
  14. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    If your computer doesn't know what an electron beam welder is then you failed.
     
  15. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    My computer doesn't know anything.
     
  16. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Useful
     
  17. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    So if I put it in water would it power a steam engine?
     
  18. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Lol and if it leaked it would freeze itself lol.
     
  19. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Lol and if it leaked it would freeze itself lol.
     
  20. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    Iron like gold is centrally located on the table... They are similar in reactivity. Please excuse my vast idiosyncratic oversimplifications. And the odd comments I often enjoy at times.

    That said, in terms of the proposed experiment adding helium could be a larger mistake than adding too much potassium. Potassium, I assume, would combine with some semiconductor and reduce in volume as a complete electron shell in solid form. as opposed to helium which would not combine and expand in volume as a gas to a greater degree given changes in temperature.

    Likewise gold is naturally fissionable and could create unwanted changes in temperature, pressure, and even completely unintended results. So even though it is less likely to bond with many substances I can't rule it in as a safer material simply because it is less likely to form a chemical bond.

    The goal is to safely have as many elements as possible in a singular location without the container breaking.

    So I may be conflagrating the basic assumptions of chemical reactivity with possible undesired outcomes when I say iron is the most "stable" choice I been able to decipher.
     
  21. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    Iron is definitely not the least chemically reactive element, it is not even the least reactive metal.

    Why do you like to make up things? I find learning about real science is very rewarding.
     
  22. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Possibly you're confusing chemical reactivity with fusion energy - which would not apply in this hypothesized box.
     
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  23. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

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    I'm not saying it is chemically less reactive than any other material.

    Just that it is a stable choice for its intended use.
     
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