what happens if?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Beaconator, Mar 13, 2019.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    True, but better safe than sorry.
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    Well, at least a partial answer to your 'what would happen?' question is: 'fusion will not occur'. So you don't need to worry about fusion energies.
     
    exchemist likes this.
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,037
    Oh bullshit! What you said was wrong and you aren't enough of an adult to admit it.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    Wrong as in worded incorrectly or poorly yes, but not wrong as in I was ignorant of facts or I intended to substitute my own reality.
     
  8. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    Alright so lets say we managed to create this monsterous disaster.

    What might happen if I throw a nickel or piece of gold at it?
     
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,141
    Gibberish.
     
  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    It would bounce off the iron exterior and land on the floor.
    What are you expecting?
     
  11. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,141
    Yes. One can attach some meaning to Beaconator's post 57 (if only it had been post 56

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    ) by assuming he has in mind, in some dim way, the curve of nuclear stability or nuclear binding energy:-

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Iron, being, as he says in the middle, more or less, actually more like a third of the way - of the naturally occurring elements, requires the most binding energy to be input to break its nucleus apart and is thus the most stable element, in terms of nuclear reactivity. It is the ultimate "ash" of stars.

    But as everyone but Bowser appreciates, this has nothing at all to do with chemical stability, which is determined by the stability and occupancy of the electron shells of the atom, rather than its nucleus. The electron configuration of Fe is [Ar] 3d64s2, so it has a partially filled set of 3d orbitals. This makes it quite a reactive element, forming a large range of compounds, generally involving the cations Fe²⁺and Fe³⁺ and including an extensive range of complexes, some of them of huge biochemical importance, e.g haemoglobin.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2020
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
  13. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    I would expect them both to be magnetically attracted.

    Can't tell you why, but there are reasons for it somewhere.
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    Gold does not react to magnetism.

    And, while nickel and iron do, they will not, by themselves, attract anything.
     
  15. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    Yet magnetism has been induced in non magnetic materials such as magnesium.

    I was pretty surprised it had been and in no way based my question upon the research.
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    And gold, yes.

    But what of it? There's no magnetizing source in the target object.
     
  17. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    There is no electric field?

    Possibly no aluminum, gallium, or indium; Yet one similarity remains. The target object and these are both slightly electronegative and to nearly the same degree by my estimation.
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,141
    This is again very garbled. Metals tend to lose electrons to form cations in their chemical reactions. That makes them electropositive, not electronegative. Electronegative elements are things like the halogens (F, Cl Br, I) that form anions, i.e. like to gain an extra electron.

    But in any case a metal object that has not been given an electric charge by some means is electrically neutral (the number of electrons balances the charge on the nuclei) and does not create an electric field around itself.
     
  19. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    It is not a hollowed out iron shell we are throwing pennies at.
     
  20. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    ?
     
  21. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    Wait what?

    Magnetism is generated by what now?
     
  22. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,193
    Your response to Ex is a non sequitur twice over.
    What do hollowed out iron shells or pennies have to do with the electrical balance of an object he mentioned?
     
  23. Beaconator Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    872
    Alright.

    We took 25 elements, most of which are organic building blocks, and wrapped them up in #26 Iron. Not w1 or tool steel but as pure iron as we can find.

    We had to put our entire setup in a vaccume and weld the top on there somehow. It cost about $10,000.

    (This is all still theoretical)
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page