What stock to buy?

Discussion in 'Business & Economics' started by Saint, Feb 1, 2021.

  1. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    I had seen there are funds got 400% return.
     
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  3. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    I've been in stocks that have seen 1200% and 6600% returns in a year. But these are rarities. On average, funds (and average stocks) return between 7% and 10%.

    If you are going to invest, assume a return of 7% a year, and plan your investing around that. If you need more than that, then DO NOT INVEST IN THE STOCK MARKET. You will end up broke and unhappy.
     
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  5. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Platforms are linked to a company, and usually you will need to use a company registered for your country. However, all the platforms I have used allow you to purchase any publically available mutual fund that it is legal to buy in that country.
    For example, in the UK I wouldn't be able to buy a mutual fund that is only available to residents of the US. I also can't buy ETFs based on cryptocurrencies (the UK's FCA has, in their infinitie wisdom, banned the sale of such to the public!! ^&%$ing ^&$%s!) The UK would have to give the platform the right to trade that fund.
    So I can not say whether you can buy UK or US funds through the platform you use. But on the UK platforms I've used I have never had an issue buying stocks or funds from European or US companies.
    Sure, and some have even more. It depends on what stocks they have in their portfolio. Usually the more diversified the lower but more steady the returns. As Billvon said, aim for c.7%. In the UK 7% return is on the higher side of a reasonable return. No advisor to the public should really be advising a 10% return; normally 5-8% average return for financial planning purposes, depending on how safe you want to be.

    If you're looking at a fund that has achieved 400% then there are 2 questions: which stocks are in the portfolio, and why have those stocks gone up so much.
    It might be that the entire sector has gone up. It might be that the fund only has a few stocks, and one of them struck it lucky.
    Whatever the reason, you should ask yourself what the likelihood is of achieving a good return in the future. There is nothing worse than being enticed by a fund that has just (in the last year) grown significantly, only for the sector to correct itself after you have invested, or for all the good news in the sector/stocks to have already been absorbed in the price, meaning that there is no real good news to support the future growth of the price.

    Personally, unless you have some good knowledge about a stock, don't expect massive returns. I would suggest 6-8% is a decent average annual return to get over the long term, at least from a reasonably diverse portfolio of stocks from around the world. I'd certainly be reasonably happy with that in the UK if I was looking for a relatively safe level of return. Some years you'll gain more, some you might actually lose, but over the longer term it's a reasonable return to aim for in my experience. If you want to take more risk you can obviously reap higher returns, but then you might also lose more.
     
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  7. Saint Valued Senior Member

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  8. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Why don't you search on the internet for information about them and make your own judgement?
     
  9. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Yes, it is! Definitely.
    No, it's a terrible bank.

    Now that you have all the Internet feedback you need, will you choose it?
     
  10. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    It looks like a good bank. The clients seem to like to drink coffee in bed while reading their statements.
     
  11. parmalee peripatetic artisan Valued Senior Member

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    I'm seeing a woman on a hammock and a guy on a couch, where are these folks drinking coffee in bed? Regardless, their ability to successfully incorporate stock photos on their website speaks volumes.
     
  12. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    can you purchase them on the international market via an offshore company platform ?

    America practically invented that type of getting around government tax & regulation laws
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2021
  13. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    You obviously don't have the exceptional attention span that I do.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    Stare at the woman on a hammock long enough and the truth will be revealed...
     
  14. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Probably, but to be honest it might be far more hassle than simply trading directly in the crypto on the various exchanges. The FCA (and UK government) haven't banned that (yet) which makes their banning of ETFs based on crypto rather ridiculous - pushing people toward riskier ways of getting the exposure to crypto that they want. I know the UK also clamped down on offshore companies as they see their primary purpose to evade tax. So bit of a minefield for anyone not particulary experienced in such matters.
    So if I ever sell and then want to reinvest in the crypto market, I'll go the direct investment route.
     
  15. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    An American who make money in trading bitcoin, does he need to pay tax for his profit made?
     
  16. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Bitcoin is treated as property in the USA, so gains from the sale of Bitcoin follow the Capital Gains tax regime.
     
  17. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Money made on platform like Coinbase, will it be charged taxes?
     
  18. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    You live in Malaysia right? We don't know your tax laws.
     
  19. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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  20. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Malaysia only allow to trade in Luno.com
    Other platforms are illegal.
     
  21. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    i have always been afraid of loosing my money investing in stock
    now i dont have any money to invest so the question is rather pointless
    had at my best i diverted funds to lets say bitcoins, & it had not been stolen, which in all likely hood since it appeared that i got hacked several times over 8 year period or so
    they likely would have stolen them
    had i managed to maintain them, i probably would have sold them several years ago and missed the big rise.
    an investor once told me, if you have moderate money, invest in consumer goods
    they tend to never go down, they give very little return but you wont lose your money and make small modest gains which you turn around and put back in. you then have a retirement fund which delivers a very small income in dividends.
    assuming it doesn't crash & you lose everything
    he said to me. you have very good banks so your almost equally safer putting it in the bank.
     
  22. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    It depends on what you mean by "safe". Of course money is safer in a bank than it is in the stock market. Of course it's not going to increase in value and over time, due to inflation, it will be worth less.

    I wouldn't really call speculating in Bitcoin to be "investing".
     
  23. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    see historical chart,
    invest in mutual fund is very very safe.
     

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