Why haven't other animals developed effective defense mechanisms against humans?

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by YourOl' UncleEarl, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. YourOl' UncleEarl Registered Member

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    New here. I'm YourOl' UncleEarl.
    Anyway, this has been on my mind for a while now.

    When animals face pressures in their environment, they either adapt or die. One of those pressures is hunting (or predation) from predators. Humans have become the most dangerous predator on the planet. As predator and prey are locked in an arms race for survival, the prey develop defense mechanisms and strategies to avoid becoming lunch. Humans don't just kill for food, we also kill for fun. We have put pressures on just about every animal known, especially endangered species. He even hunt apex predators. So why is it that despite the pressure from humans, animals seem incapable of developing an effective defense to fool, scare, fend off, and kill humans or even, as far fetched as it may seem, cancel out our technological advantage? Is it that they don't have enough time, as evolution takes hundreds of thousands or even millions of years? Or is it something else entirely?
     
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  3. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    In effect the simpler the organism is the greater its survivability, Hellstom predicted that the oldest invasive species such as Insects and at an even smaller level, viruses, will be the ultimate survivers in a catastrophic global event. The smaller (or shielded), the greater its adapability and escape "natual selection" for millions of years. Humans survive by creating artificial ecosystems, such as ranching, but will always become more and more seperated from "the wild" (uncontrolled) state of the world.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
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  5. YourOl' UncleEarl Registered Member

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    True. Things change.
     
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  7. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Humans weapon technology is evolving way faster than a single species ability to evolve.

    The other obvious point is this is evolution we are seeing. There have been multiple extinction events that have occurred and after the event new and quite different species arise. The current extinction event is not a meteor or a volcano it's us.
     
  8. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    I think the best other animals could do would be to develop means of conveying diseases into human habitats. Sadly, for the rest of life on Earth, this isn't likely.
     
  9. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    I agree and it will most likely affect the largest animals which require large resources.
    In the end it's the smallest organisms which will survive because they are able to adapt to anything we can do to the earth's ecosystem.
    When it comes to survival of changes in the ecosphere, the insect, most of which are resistant to disease, will be the most favorably positioned.
     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    Naegleria Fowleri seems to be doing pretty well against humans.
     
  11. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    I believe I read somewhere that the total bio-mass of ants and termite insects is equal to or greater than the combined mass of all humans
    http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/may2001/989366143.En.r.html
    and
    The insect seems to be doing very well, despite our efforts to eradicate "pests"
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  12. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    One of the important factors is generations per year. More generations, more chances that a mutation will turn out to be favorable in this scenario.

    And that brings up a point which may have been covered already, but so what? If a mutation that would help the critter survive DOESN'T appear then they're goners. This means that the vast majority of critters are goners as such a mutation, being by nature entirely random, won't appear in their species.
     
  13. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Well, I read that 95% of all species that have ever existed are extinct, and replaced by newer species (slowly by evolution or quickly by mutation).
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  14. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah, because "500,000,000 years" is great than "today" according my prof at Purdue.

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    (The whole class was rolling.)
     
  15. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Because nothing would work? Humans could easily circumvent any new behaviors. But some species are doing well in human habitats; coyotes, raccoons, rats, crows, cockroaches, flies, bedbugs, pigeons...
     
  16. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Along with "time", don't forget "spaces", and especially biological diversity (adaptability) at the smallest level.

    According to Hazen, the entire earth as a natural laboratory, has performed some 2 trillion, quadrillion, quadrillion, quadrillion bio-chemical interactions during these 500,000,000 years. How many degrees would that earn at college level....

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  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Humans and animals are not locked in an arms race for survival.

    Humans didn't just win that race. They killed it. They did a couple of victory laps, painting a penis on the forehead of the animals as they passed them, mooned the reporters, and flew to Bermuda where they're drinking champagne from the stolen trophy.

    Seriously. Humans went from "If God had intended Man to fly..." to "exploring the interstellar medium" in, like, two generations.
     
  18. YourOl' UncleEarl Registered Member

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    I doubt it's possible but I imagine something along the lines of animals developing bullet resistant hides. Say, for example, a bear gets shot, runs off, and manages to not only live but completely heal the wound and develop a resistent hide. I know that's not how evolution works, but as said in Jurassic Park, life finds a way. Plus, I would pay to see the look on a trophy hunter or poacher's face when they shoot an animal and the bullets just bounce off as the animal charges them. Clean up on aisle five !!!
     
  19. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Tru dat.
     
  20. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Yep, but our weapons are domesticated guarddogs and cats. Their wild ancestors have learned and formed a mutually depend symbiotic relationship with humans which is mutually beneficial to both species.

    Think of this, what is a farm without a competent guard dog and a bunch of cats in the barn and in the house? And some perhaps with a thriving bee-hive to pollinate the crops?

    That's the secret power of the insect; its brain is so small, that it can process only mechanical mirror actions. But a hive mind can make some very effective and informed decisions, but without any emotional attachment. Little robots, executing their simple program, evolved from millions of years of natural selection.

    OTOH, some combat "war" dogs have been awarded medals of honor for bravery.

    But some humans like to show off their Gorilla hand ashtray, to other outdoor sportsmen..

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    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  21. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Biological "weapons" are handy, the cost to reproduce them is a bag of dog food.
     
  22. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    I forgot. Dogs and cats are also quite well adapted to human societies. Also fleas.
     
  23. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    I've read that cats lived with humans for thousands of years before humans were domesticated. Some cats still think that was a bad move.
     

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