Will natural wonders ever stop

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by Write4U, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    It shouldn't. These effects are not a dilution effect, nor do they involve "changing reality" as Write4U unhelpfully expresses it.

    More here:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colloidal_gold
     
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  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Contradiction in terms.
     
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  5. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    To the observer it does. A red church pane is made from gold.
     
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  7. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    The maths (over time) seemed pretty deterministic. We just don't know the process, so we call it probabilistic.

    Now if the maths were random, then one could claim pure probabilism, but as long as we are able to make a measurement which we know is true, given a fixed length of time, it can no longer be called probabilistic. I think the term probabilistically determinstic (depending on length of time) is appropriate in these specific instances.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
  8. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    No it isn't. Really, your use of language is inexcusably bad.

    Some red stained glass is made by adding a very small amount of colloidal gold with the appropriate particle size distribution. "Reality" is only "altered" by this in the same sense in which you "alter reality" by painting your sitting room wall. Leave the woo out, there's a good chap.
     
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Ballocks. Quantum indeterminacy appears to be, on the evidence, built into nature.

    Some people cling to a belief that there must be further layers of understanding of nature that resolve these indeterminacies, but that is no more than a metaphysical position, with no supporting evidence.
     
  10. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    I do not know. But can Mirage & difference in thermal radiation and more exposure of diluted form between diluted and solid substance relevant?
     
  11. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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  12. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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  13. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Have you ever heard anyone say; "that's a beautiful color of gold" when looking at a old church window pane?

    Right, the color of gold changes relative to its size. By that argument, we could say that "gold" is a relative term, a probabilistic (or artificial) but deterministic color. We CAN say that gold at nano-size is red.

    IOW with a size or time qualification almost anything can be observed and labeled.

    Thus the term "half-life" is deterministic term, indicating a high probability, depending on time.
    Some things are deterministic, but require a long time to become manifest.
    We also call "doubling time" deterministic (it is a mathematical function), but in reality it is a probabilistic estimate depending on time , space, and available resources.

    It is theoretically (mathematically) correct, but not necessarily physically deterministic in reality.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    No you can't. The link I provided explains that a range of colours can be produced, depending on the particle size, shapes and other factors.

    And the colour "gold' is defined to be that of the metal in its bulk state. So no, the colour "gold" is not a "relative" term, any more than "blue" is.

    (Although, slightly off-topic, the reason why gold metal has its distinctive colour is in fact attributable to the effects of relativity on the orbitals of its electrons.

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  15. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    This may be of interest

    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja906506j

     
  16. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Because it is interesting?
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    No....a bit.....



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  19. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

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    From WriteU4 Post 60
    The above in reply to my post 58 & elsewhere
    What is probabilistic determinism? Semantics seem contradictory.

    Radioactive decay statistics are probabilistic. If the half life is one minute & you start with 1024 Grams, the expected results are as follows.

    After minute one, 512 grams have decayed, leaving 512 grams.
    After minute two: 256 more grams have decayed, leaving 256 Grams.
    After minute 3: 128 grams have decayed, leaving 128 grams.

    The above are like the statistics of flipping coins & discarding those which land heads.

    As I have posted elsewhere.
    BTW: A few kilograms of a radioactive substance can contain 10E24 molecules. Due to the large number of molecules, accurate clocks can be based on radioactive decay.
     

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