Word of the Day. Post it Here

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Captain Kremmen, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Shibboleths

    Shibboleths a word or custom whose variations in pronunciation or style can be used to differentiate members of ingroups from those of outgroups

    SHIB·BO·LETH
    /ˈSHibələTH/

    Origin

    mid 17th century: from Hebrew šibbōleṯ ‘ear of corn’, used as a test of nationality by its difficult pronunciation (Judg. 12:6)

    Google - shibboleth origin

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  3. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    We used to have a kind-of-a-sort-of-a shibboleth where I live. If you said "dinner" when you meant "supper", you weren't from around here. Unfortunately, TV has homogenized our language so that more and more people are saying "dinner" when they mean "supper". But those of use who have been around for an eon or two still eat dinner at lunchtime.
     
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  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Where I come from they're virtually interchangeable.

    Supper is more informal; dinner is more formal. You invite your children to supper; you invite your boss to dinner. Nothing to do with time-of-day. Or 'age-of-day', as Michael might say.

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    Where does that make me from?
     
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  7. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    London

    Dinner = 6pm to 8pm frame

    Supper - 10pm onwards

    No

    Michael would say as above

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  8. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Who eats a meal after 10PM?? and so often that it needs a name??

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    Any food after 830 is a 'late night snack'. 'snack' being the operative word.
     
  9. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Us shift workers

    After 11pm late night snack is 2 Digestive biscuits and Coco or Ovaltine

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  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Ovaltine and Digestive cookies...
    Wow, that takes me back 40 years or so. Didn't know they still made them.
     
  11. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    quadraplexoidalscope

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  12. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    quadriplegicrealityscope.
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    I eat lunch at noon, supper at 6 PM and _____ at 10 PM or later. If I had to give it a name I'd call it "night lunch".
    "Evening" is 6 PM to 10 PM. "Night" is 10 PM to 6 AM. "Late night" is 2 AM to 4 AM. "Early morning" is 4 AM to 8 AM.
    A "snack" is a cookie or a cracker. A sandwich is a "meal".
     
  14. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Brunch is breakfast blended between breakfast and lunch. To late for one, to early for other

    Yes just made new word, nunch, night lunch

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  15. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    You just made new word, nunch, night lunch

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  16. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    This is going in Word of the Day thread as well

    A sophomaniac is somebody who is inordinately proud of his intellect. If you were a sophomaniac, you would not be as smart as you thought you were

    *****

    Pantomath. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A pantomath is a person who wants to know and knows everything

    The word itself is not to be found in common online English dictionaries, the OED, dictionaries of obscure words, or dictionaries of neologisms.

    *****

    neologism

    noun

    a new word or expression or a new meaning of a word

    Full Definition

    1 : a new word, usage, or expression

    2 : Psychology a new word that is coined especially by a person affected with schizophrenia and is meaningless except to the coiner

    Google sophomaniac and Miriam-Webster

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  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Dunning Kruger Syndrome.
     
  18. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    insurrection
     
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  19. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    conurbation [ kon-er-bey-shuh n ]
    noun
    an extensive urban area resulting from the expansion of several cities or towns so that they coalesce but usually retain their separate identities.
     
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  20. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Urban manatee; an Englishman who divides his time between bed and drinking his favorite beverage in the hot-tub.
     
  21. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    A prison term?.....

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  22. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    paddy rollers


    "Slave patrols called patrollers, patterrollers, pattyrollers or paddy rollers,[1] by the slaves, were organized groups of armed white men who monitored and enforced discipline upon black slaves in the antebellumU.S. southern states. The slave patrols' function was to police slaves, especially runaways and defiant slaves. They also formed river patrols to prevent escape by boat. Slave patrols were first established in South Carolina in 1704, and the idea spread throughout the colonies."


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slave_patrol

    I heard Samuel S Jackson on the TV use the word "paddy rollers" and so I looked it up.

    Says a lot. Maybe explains a bit too.

     
  23. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Sea-lioning

    Sealioning (also spelled sea-lioning and sea lioning) is a type of trolling or harassment which consists of pursuing people with persistent requests for evidence or repeated questions, while maintaining a pretense of civility and sincerity.[1][2][3][4] It may take the form of "incessant, bad-faith invitations to engage in debate".[5]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sealioning

    Found this today

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