Word of the Day. Post it Here

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Captain Kremmen, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Or possibly someone specialising in the effects of nitrogen?
     
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  3. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    TL;DR
     
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  5. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Obviated

    ob·vi·ate

    verb
    past tense: obviated;
    past participle: obviated

    remove(a need or difficulty).

    "the Venetian blinds obviated the need for curtains"

    avoid; prevent."

    "a parachute can be used to obviate disaster"

    Definitions from Oxford Languages

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  7. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Yes that is an interesting word ,and not that uncommon.

    As a derivation (must be from the Latin surely) I break it up into "ob"and "via" where "ob" means something (a preposition) have forgotten but possibly "opposite" and "via" we all know.

    So ,I put it together and it sounds to me like "skirting around"

    But that might well be wrong.
     
  8. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Obviate derives from Late Latin obviare (meaning "to meet or withstand") and Latin obviam, which means "in the way" and is also an ancestor of our adjective "obvious." "Obviate" has a number of synonyms in English, including "prevent," "preclude," and "avert"; all of these words can mean to hinder or stop something.Aug 27, 2020
    www.merriam-webster.com › obviate
    Obviate | Definition of Obviate by Merriam-Webster

    Google obviate etymology

    Your welcome

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  9. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Apoptosis

    Programmed cell death and how it is different from necrosis

    https://www.khanacademy.org/science...orderly process,maintains balance in the body.

    Apoptosis
    Origin

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    1970s: from Greek apoptōsis ‘falling off’,

    from apo ‘from’ + ptōsis ‘falling, a fall’.

    So we have cells programmed to self destruct so we don't have webbed hands

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    along with lots of other unwanted features

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  10. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Polyglot

    adjective
    1. knowing or using several languages.
      "a polyglot career woman"
    noun
    1. a person who knows and is able to use several languages.
    Definitions from Oxford Languages

    Not a lot of parrots

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  11. geordief Valued Senior Member

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  12. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Deepity

    Profound-seeming but superficial equivocation
    • 2000 October 23, Ross, Don, Dennett's Philosophy: A Comprehensive Assessment, Cambridge: MIT Press, →ISBN, OL 9616138M, page 171:
      The air of paradox, however, is merely what Dennett calls (in conversation) a “deepity,” a claim that appears profound but is in fact a superficial equivocation. ... The deepity of unseeming seemings dissolves when one considers the unstated temporal dimension of all judgments, including judgments of appearance and reality.
    A deepity is a proposition that seems to be profound because it is actually logically ill-formed. It has (at least) two readings and balances precariously between them. On one reading it is true but trivial. And on another reading it is false, but would be earth-shattering if true.

    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:deepity#:~:text=A deepity is a proposition,be earth-shattering if true.

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  13. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Are there any well known examples? Any well known public figures who have made a habit of coming out with deepities?

    If not , who would be most likely to do so?

    New Age kind of personalities perhaps?

    Deepity Dawg?
     
  14. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Not found any

    But about deepities and a good example used to off put a friend this shows how

    https://www.philosophytalk.org/blog/deepities-and-bullshit

    A bunch in here. Not read them all

    https://bycommonconsent-com.cdn.amp...ommonconsent.com/2016/02/20/mormon-deepities/

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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2020
  15. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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  16. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Autological

    Etymology

    From German autologisch, from Ancient Greek αὐτός (autós, “self”) + λόγος (lógos, “word”)

    autological
    (not comparable)
    1. (grammar) Of a phrase (especially an adjective), possessing the property it describes.
      The word polysyllabic is autological, but the word monosyllabic is not.

      Because the word
      short is in fact short, it is considered autological.

      The word
      noun is itself a noun, and is thus autological.

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  17. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    And sesquipedalian to you sir,too.

    If that ain't too long winded.
     
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  18. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Sesquipedalian might be a perfect word to use with a particular poster

    Currently using a few short expletives trying to tune a TV in hotel

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  19. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Hygge

    A Danish and Norwegian word for a mood of coziness and comfortable conviviality with feelings of wellness and contentment.

    Etymology

    The word hygge comes from a Danish word meaning "to give courage, comfort, joy"

    Close enough to Huggy for me

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  20. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Not your average hazelnut ...it's a..... Walnut

    https://www.etymonline.com/word/walnut


    Old English walhnutu "nut of the walnut tree," literally "foreign nut," from wealh "foreign" (see Welsh) + hnutu (see nut). Compare Old Norse valhnot, Middle Low German walnut, Middle Dutch walnote, Dutch walnoot, German Walnuss. So called because it was introduced from Gaul and Italy, distinguishing it from the native hazel nut. Compare the Late Latin name for it, nux Gallica, literally "Gaulish nut." Applied to the tree itself from 1600 (earlier walnut tree, c. 1400).

    Another one of those pesky foreign imports.
     
  21. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Those are rarely used words, when you speak it nobody will understand you.
     
  22. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Can you suggest some more common words?

    Mama ,Papa ?
     
  23. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    pellucid

    definition - clear in meaning, expression or style
     

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