Word of the Day. Post it Here

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Captain Kremmen, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
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    flirt
    /flərt/
    verb
    1. 1.
      behave as though attracted to or trying to attract someone, but for amusement rather than with serious intentions.
      "it amused him to flirt with her"
     
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  3. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    hal·cy·on
    /ˈhalsēən/
    adjective
    1. denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.
      "the halcyon days of the mid-1980s, when profits were soaring"

      Similar:
      serene

      calm

      pleasant

      balmy

      tranquil

      peaceful

      temperate

      mild

      quiet

      gentle

      placid

      still

      windless
      stormless
      happy

      carefree

      blissful

      golden

      joyful

      joyous

      contented

      idyllic

      palmy

      flourishing

      thriving

      prosperous

      successful


      Opposite:
      stormy

      troubled

    noun
    1. 1.
      a tropical Asian and African kingfisher with brightly colored plumage.

    2. 2.
      a mythical bird said by ancient writers to breed in a nest floating at sea at the winter solstice, charming the wind and waves into calm.
     
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  5. wegs Matter and Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    I've been pondering today, the usage of ''in spite of'' vs. ''despite.''

    Despite and in spite of are both prepositions meaning “regardless of,” “even though,” or “notwithstanding.” They can be used interchangeably.

    • Despite is always written as one word.
    • In spite of is always written as three words.
    Personally, I like to use ''despite'' more often.
     
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  7. Magical Realist Valued Senior Member

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    ob·se·qui·ous
    /əbˈsēkwēəs/
    adjective
    1. obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree.
      "they were served by obsequious waiters"
     
  8. geordief Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,142
    Fairly
    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fairly

    One meaning is "Quite"
    Another is "with emphasis"

    So ,if I was to say someone was "fairly knackered" it would be ambiguous without the context. ie "quite knackered" or "really knackered"

    Personally in the latter case I would emphasize the adjective and would not in the former.

    I don't know if others would follow this method of distinguishing between the usages in spoken speech

    "Fairly" can also mean "in a fair way"
     
  9. Twelve Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    377
    Iatrogenesis
    Iatrogenesis is defined as any injury or illness that occurs as a result of medical care (Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary 2005).
     
  10. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    2,142
    Think "iatros" is Greek for doctor
     
  11. Twelve Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    377
    Haggard:
    Tired or exhausted in appearance.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    12,529
    Has anyone done “knackered”? If not, perhaps you might oblige…..
     
  13. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    12,529
  14. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    13,077
    Not looked up "knackered" but from memory I recall if a bull has had its testicals removed it was deemed to be "knackered"

    Another meaning "of being exhausted" might be from the farmer "being exhausted" from "knackrting" a herd of bulls in a *knackers yard" to improve live stock

    Had to look up the below

    The Knocker, Knacker, or Tommyknocker (US) is a mythical, subterranean, gnome-like creature in Cornish and Devon folklore. The Welsh counterparts are coblynau. It is closely related to the Irishleprechaun, Kentish kloker and the English and Scottishbrownie. The Cornish described the creature as a little person 2 ft 0 in (0.61 m) tall, with a disproportionately large head, long arms, wrinkled skin, and white whiskers. It wears a tiny version of standard miner's garb and commits random mischief, such as stealing miners' unattended tools and food.

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  15. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks.Yes I have had the derivation of knackered on my mind for some time.Over here a knacker is a common term of abuse or disrespect for a traveler or tinker.
     
  16. geordief Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,142
    Laiking

    "Playing" in Yorkshire dialect

    Heard this on the Brendan o'Connor radio show (RTE) who had Patrick Stewart as a guest(new book)

    Art tha laikin aht = art thou coming out to play?

    I recognized the word "laikin" as it is the same as " a leke" in modern day norwegian(meaning also to play)

    Think he also said that "Lakers" were "Players**" in Elizabethan times (Patrick Stewart still works in the theatre)

    **as in performers on the stage
     
  17. Twelve Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    377
    Leftovers
    1. Food remaining uneaten at the end of a meal, esp. when saved for later use.
    2. Anything left or remaining from a larger amount;
      remainder.
     
  18. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    12,529
    This Wiki article seems to bring together most of these strands, based on the disposal of animal carcasses being the primary original meaning :https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knacker
     
  19. ThazzarBaal Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    648
    I thought in spite of meant to be spiteful, used in conjunction with a purpose or reason to be. I always used despite to convey a do it anyway, regardless of a reason or purpose not to. Slightly different usages, but similar.
     
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  20. wegs Matter and Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    That’s what I thought too, so we were both wrong.

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  21. ThazzarBaal Registered Senior Member

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    No
     
  22. geordief Valued Senior Member

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    Words mean what I want them to mean

    Ask Alice

     
  23. wegs Matter and Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,254
    Serendipity - ser•en•dip•ity

    Definition - the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way

    It could be viewed as a fortunate stroke of serendipity that she stumbled upon a science forum, and made quite a few unplanned, yet pleasant connections.
     
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