A New Humanism

coberst

Registered Senior Member
A New Humanism

The term ‘humanism’ became prominent during the Renaissance. It was developed at the end of the Middle Ages; resulting from the revival of classical letters. This rebirth focused upon humans as the center of an effort to reassert self-determination. This early humanism focused on culture and learning, in an effort to center intellectual efforts on the human need and interests rather than on the divine.

Modern Humanism is "a naturalistic philosophy that rejects all supernaturalism and relies primarily upon reason and science, democracy and human compassion. Modern Humanism has a dual origin, both secular and religious, and these constitute its sub-categories.”

A critical characteristic of Modern Humanism is the fact that there existed two factions of humanism, those whose world view centers on the divine while a second faction whose world view centers on secularism.

In America a New Humanist movement began in the early part of the twentieth century, which sought to solve the crises in knowledge. They sought a New Birth of rational humanity. “The goal was human happiness and dignity; the ideals were classical; the means were reason and critical intellect; and the enemy was many-headed.”

The New Humanists opposed the mechanistic worship of stuff while denying the nature of the human spirit; it respected subjectivity and revered the “depth and uniqueness of man’s spirit” but distrusted the irresponsible, emotional, weak, and uncritical nature of Romanticism. They detested superstition, supernaturalism, and authoritarianism. Their idea was to train an intellectual elite who could “reintroduce responsible humanity into the mechanical shell of modern living…The weapon was to be a new humanistic education; the ammunition was the vast store of literature accumulated by the great and balanced minds of the best ages of history.”

The New Humanism fathered the Great Discussion in the form of the Great Books.
 
Is that the end of your lecture?
Or should I come back to class for the next seqment?
When's the test?
When do I get my final grade in the class?

Baron Max
 
What is on this list of great books?

Moreover, what is the take of this Neo-Humanist school on gender issues, democracy, and capitalism?
 
Prince


INDEX BY AUTHOR Of Great Books

Aeschylus . Apollonius . Aquinas . Archimedes . Aristophanes . Aristotle . Augustine . Marcus Aurelius . Austen . Francis Bacon . Balzac . Bergson . Berkeley . The Bible . Bohr . Boswell . Calvin . Cather . Cervantes . Chaucer . Chekhov . Conrad . Copernicus . Dante . Darwin . Descartes . Dewey . Dickens . Diderot . Dostoevsky . Eddington . Einstein . George Eliot . T.S. Eliot . Emerson . Engels . Epictetus . Erasmus . Euclid . Euripides . Faraday . Faulkner . Fielding . Fitzgerald . Fourier . Freud . Galen . Galileo . Gibbon . Gilbert . Goethe . Hamilton . Hardy . Harvey . Hegel . Heidegger . Heisenberg . Herodotus . Hippocrates . Hobbes . Homer . Hume . Huygens . Ibsen . Henry James . William James . Jay . Joyce . Kafka . Kant . Kepler . Keynes . Kierkegaard . Lawrence . Leibnitz . Locke . Lucretius . Machiavelli . Madison . Mann . Marx . Melville . Mill . Milton . Moliere . Montaigne . Montesquieu . Nietzsche . Newton . Nicomachus . O'Neill . Orwell . Paine . Pascal . Planck . Plato . Plotinus . Plutarch . Poincare . Proust . Ptolemy . The Quran (Koran) . Rabelais . Racine . Rousseau . Russell . Schroedinger . Shaw . Shakespeare . Adam Smith . Sophocles . Spinoza . Sterne . Swift . Tacitus . Thoreau . Thucydides . Tolstoy . Tocqueville . Twain . Veblen . Virgil . Voltaire . Whitehead . Wittgenstein . Woolf

You can go to this site and find the title of these books. You can also do a Google of Great Books to get all the rest of the info on this great but unsuccessful effort.

http://books.mirror.org/
 
Is that the end of your lecture?
Or should I come back to class for the next seqment?
When's the test?
When do I get my final grade in the class?

Baron Max



I am reading a book by Earnest Becker "Beyond Alienation". Becker is making an argument which is long and I think it is important. I am trying to set the stage for the argument.

It is the basic problem of means and ends. One cannot comprehend the argument until one has the means to do so. This is part of furnishing those means. Like a person cannot comprehend algebra until one has first learned multiplication. I am learning the necessary means to comprehend his argument. I am taking the forum along so that you too can comprehend the argument when we get there.

No extra charge, and no exams.

We have many problems that are a result of the fact that we have never learned to develop a moral rationality to handle the high tech world we have created with our great scientific rationality. Becker offers a solution that I am trying now to comprehend and several of my posts are part of his setting the stage for his argument as to how we might solve this problem.
 
Aeschylus . Apollonius . Aquinas . Archimedes . Aristophanes . Aristotle . Augustine . Marcus Aurelius . Austen . Francis Bacon . Balzac . Bergson . Berkeley . The Bible . Bohr . Boswell . Calvin . Cather . Cervantes . Chaucer . Chekhov . Conrad . Copernicus . Dante . Darwin . Descartes . Dewey . Dickens . Diderot . Dostoevsky . Eddington . Einstein . George Eliot . T.S. Eliot . Emerson . Engels . Epictetus . Erasmus . Euclid . Euripides . Faraday . Faulkner . Fielding . Fitzgerald . Fourier . Freud . Galen . Galileo . Gibbon . Gilbert . Goethe . Hamilton . Hardy . Harvey . Hegel . Heidegger . Heisenberg . Herodotus . Hippocrates . Hobbes . Homer . Hume . Huygens . Ibsen . Henry James . William James . Jay . Joyce . Kafka . Kant . Kepler . Keynes . Kierkegaard . Lawrence . Leibnitz . Locke . Lucretius . Machiavelli . Madison . Mann . Marx . Melville . Mill . Milton . Moliere . Montaigne . Montesquieu . Nietzsche . Newton . Nicomachus . O'Neill . Orwell . Paine . Pascal . Planck . Plato . Plotinus . Plutarch . Poincare . Proust . Ptolemy . The Quran (Koran) . Rabelais . Racine . Rousseau . Russell . Schroedinger . Shaw . Shakespeare . Adam Smith . Sophocles . Spinoza . Sterne . Swift . Tacitus . Thoreau . Thucydides . Tolstoy . Tocqueville . Twain . Veblen . Virgil . Voltaire . Whitehead . Wittgenstein . Woolf

No Laozi, Leizi, or Mencius?
 
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Coberst:

Hmmm. An excellent book list.

Remaining true to a Western canon, I would suggest the exclusion of the Quran, and the inclusion of:

Hitler ("Mein Kampf" was probably the most important book of the 20th century). London (Jack). Scott (Sir Walter). Wilde. Poe. Crane. Jung. Schopenhauer. Hayek. Beowulf. Stevenson. Shelley (both Percy and Mary). Keats. Tennyson. Sartre. Caesar (Julius). Galen. Paracelsus. Clausewitz. Nixon. Spencer. Burke. Stoker. Byron.

Off the top of my head, those deserve inclusion.
 
If we include Eastern sources:

The Avesta. The Vedas. Confucius. Mencius. Lao Tzu. Zhuangzi. Mao Zedong. Yamamato Tsunetomo. Murasaki and Izumi Shikibu. Morihei Ueshiba. Yukio Mishima. Musashi Miyamoto. Ono no Komachi. The Buddha. The Mahayana Canon. Bodhidharma. Dogen. Ryokan.

And from the Middle East:

The Quran. Avicenna. Rumi.

From the Jews:

Maimonides.
 
Prince

I think that you have hit upon one of the reasons for the criticism of the Great Books program. It was too static. It was not dynamic enough to follow changing social attitudes.
 
Coberst:

Yes. That is certainly a problem. But the idea of a "canon of great books" is certainly useful for education befitting a free man.

And how could I forget:

For the Eastern Canon, one must add Sun Tzu.
 
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