A womAn!!

While we're at it:
too, to, two
where, were
whether, weather
quite, quiet
their, there, they're
 
It is one woman and two or more women
"Woman" is a collapsed compound word, wif-man. Wif was originally the Anglo-Saxon word for "woman," as its cognate Weib still is in German. Man, of course, meant "person," as its cognate in modern German, man, is used the same way as our pronoun "one," to mean "one person" or "people in general."

So a wif-man was simply a female person. The plural was wif-men. Over the years it was collapsed into "woman," and its plural collapsed into "women." During the same period of time its pronunciation changed. "Women" is pronounced more like the original word, with the vowel in the accented first syllable sounding like a short I. "Woman" underwent a phonetic change in which the pronunciation of the I was influenced by the W, and became an OO sound. And since the second syllable is unstressed, both the A and the E degenerated into a schwa, a short neutral vowel with no distinct articulation.

Don't ask about the spelling. To say that the English rules of spelling are random would only be a slight exaggeration.

The original word wif was retained, but its meaning was specialized to mean a married woman. The older meaning survived longer in the compound "goodwife," which came to be pronounced "goody," as in the 18th century children's story Goody Two Shoes.

Goodwife can still be heard in Scotland, as a humorous or archaic equivalent for Mrs. It became obsolete in the rest of the anglophone world about two hundred years ago.
 
Don't ask about the spelling. To say that the English rules of spelling are random would only be a slight exaggeration.

"Woman" and "women" are pronounced differently.
Anyone who can pronounce these two words, should also be able to write them accurately.
 
"Woman" is a collapsed compound word, wif-man. Wif was originally the Anglo-Saxon word for "woman," as its cognate Weib still is in German. Man, of course, meant "person," as its cognate in modern German, man, is used the same way as our pronoun "one," to mean "one person" or "people in general."

So a wif-man was simply a female person. The plural was wif-men. Over the years it was collapsed into "woman," and its plural collapsed into "women." During the same period of time its pronunciation changed. "Women" is pronounced more like the original word, with the vowel in the accented first syllable sounding like a short I. "Woman" underwent a phonetic change in which the pronunciation of the I was influenced by the W, and became an OO sound. And since the second syllable is unstressed, both the A and the E degenerated into a schwa, a short neutral vowel with no distinct articulation.

Don't ask about the spelling. To say that the English rules of spelling are random would only be a slight exaggeration.

The original word wif was retained, but its meaning was specialized to mean a married woman. The older meaning survived longer in the compound "goodwife," which came to be pronounced "goody," as in the 18th century children's story Goody Two Shoes.

Goodwife can still be heard in Scotland, as a humorous or archaic equivalent for Mrs. It became obsolete in the rest of the anglophone world about two hundred years ago.

Wow frag dragging out the good weed . Man that was to good . It is amazing what fairy tales can tell us. That blows Me away . Dude I kneel
 
"Woman" and "women" are pronounced differently.
Anyone who can pronounce these two words, should also be able to write them accurately.

I like 2 womans the best or 5 or 6 or even 7 if the law would allow it .

Oh God Teasing is fun . Do I have to brake your finger to get a smile out of you
 
Woman, noun, singular.

Women, collective noun.

Sometimes defined as Woe Unto Men.

Frequently initiated by the incorrect use of said noun, as noted by the OP.
 
My, my, aren’t you perspicacious.

scheherazade said:
Sometimes defined as Woe Unto Men.


This would be the incorrect use of said woman, as noted.
wink.gif
 
My, my, aren’t you perspicacious.


This would be the incorrect use of said woman, as noted.
wink.gif


:eek:

LOL.......flatterer. :eek:

Nonetheless, you could prove efficacious and pertinacious on a debating team.

Perspicacious is a word that is seldom encountered in casual conversation.
 
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