albeit

Betrayer0fHope

MY COHERENCE! IT'S GOING AWAYY
Registered Senior Member
Can someone (guess who) explain this word in every sense they know how to?

The wikilink is a bit less than what I want.
 
It's a shorter version of "yes that's right, BUT", albeit not quite as cynical as that.
How about, "I grant the point, however..."? Or "... but also (semi-contrariwise)..."
Example: He's a clever bloke, albeit a little strange.


Waiting for Fraggle... ;)
 
The word sounds very logical to Dutch ears. The Dutch translation would be 'al is het'.
I guess it must be a contraction of 'all' + 'be' + 'it'. 'All' meaning something like 'even if' here, which is what the Dutch word 'al' means.
Just guessing.
 
Albeit originally came from the Old English al be (al with the modern meaning of all); the definition of the word, according to the 1906 dictionary I used, is 'although it be', with the additional definitions even though, although and notwithstanding, implying a sort of double negative.
 
I think "notwithstanding" can replace the word in question the best. I can't think of a phrase where one would/could use albeit and have it not make sense using notwithstanding. Oli's definition seems a little off, even in his own sample sentence :p
 
Notwithstanding has the reverse referencing..

To use my "slightly off" example:
He's a clever bloke, albeit a little strange - I grant he's clever, BUT he's a little strange.
Good point conceded, however there's a bad aspect.

He's a little strange, notwithstanding the fact that he's clever.

For notwithstanding the main "point" comes second.
 
"Albeit" is just a fancy way of saying "although," but (IIRC) there are more restrictions on the surrounding grammar. I don't believe it's correct to say, "I'll be there, albeit I might arrive late." You have to change it to, "I'll be there, albeit possibly late." I don't think it's a subordinating conjunction that can link two complete clauses, the way "although" can.

But I haven't used it since college so I'm not an expert.

If you really want to be archaic, the word "howbeit" means the same thing. That's one you really don't see any more.
 
I always took it as a contraction of (or belonging to the family of) "although it {may, if, possibly} be "

fraggle said:
If you really want to be archaic, the word "howbeit" means the same thing.
Now, c'mon - the one involves an obstacle or deficiency possibly overcome, despite a lack or difficulty; the other involves a means or enabling possibly inadequate, despite or with a presence or aid; no?
 
Now, c'mon - the one involves an obstacle or deficiency possibly overcome, despite a lack or difficulty; the other involves a means or enabling possibly inadequate, despite or with a presence or aid; no?
I'll take your word for it. You obviously know more about it than I do.
 
I always assumed albeit came from "all be it" and assumed that "be it" essentially means the same thing as "though" in "allthough". Another use of "be it", "be it as it may" is also almost gone from the English language. People older than me used to say "be it as it may" but people younger than me never use that phrase. "Alright" comes from "all right". There are probably other words that are contractions of all and another word.
 
People older than me used to say "be it as it may" but people younger than me never use that phrase.
I'm older than everybody and I always heard it as "be that as it may."
"Alright" comes from "all right". There are probably other words that are contractions of all and another word.
Always, altogether, also, almighty, almost. And then there's the other way, as in overall. The first set is easy to pick out by scanning a dictionary. The second is more difficult.
 
"be that as it may" as measured in google search results is more popular than "be it as it may" by 5 million results for "be that as it may" to 2 million results for "be it as it may".

I guess I was a little premature in pronouncing "be it as it may" dead.

"so be it" should also get a mention.
 
Back
Top