Movie recommends

I've always had a soft spot for "Dark Star". No sex, little action, lousy scenery, unattractive actors, cheaply made, great little movie.

Most of the set is kitchen gear - ice cube tray control panels, popcorn popper dome space helmets, a painted beach ball alien - but it blows Star Wars away IMHO. And the scenes stay with you. What you used to get in the days when people knew that the writer usually, the cinematographer sometimes, the director seldom, was the key to the movie.

"Teach the bomb phenomenology." "You are all false data." "In the beginning was darkness, and the darkness was without form and void. In addition to the darkness, there was also me."

Otherwise, more odd movies out: McCabe and Mrs Miller. Absence of Malice. Local Hero. Mad Dog and Glory. The Grifters. Days of Heaven. Close to Eden. Fool For Love. The Pope of Greenwich Village. Aguirre, The Wrath of God.

Another category: the movie that should have been great, but was botched. Not that the product was bad, exactly (it might be really good), just that the viewer is constantly aware of a transcendence that could be on that screen and isn't. Eureka. Jurassic Park. Groundhog Day. The Titanic.
 
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Most of my favorites have already been mentioned, especially by the thread-starter. (Sorry, forgot your name and too lazy to check). Boondock Saints is probably my all-time favorite.

Sin City is a nice one that I didn't see anyone mention. I like vigilante movies - they make me feel warm inside.
 
Probably been said

One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
Donnie Darko (does anyone truly understand it?)
The Lucky Number Slevin
Se7en
Pulp Fiction
The Notebook (yeah i'm a sap)
Moulin Rouge
Pathology
It's a Wonderful Life
American Psycho
To Kill a Mockingbird
Ghost
American Beauty
The Matrix
Sin City
The Butterfly Effect
Fight Club
Requiem for a Dream
Edward Scissorhands
Monsters Inc. (^.^ yeah it's animation but it's so sweet)
 
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Probably been said

One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
Donnie Darko (does anyone truly understand it?)
The Lucky Number Slevin
Se7en
Pulp Fiction
The Notebook (yeah i'm a sap)
Moulin Rouge
Pathology
It's a Wonderful Life
American Psycho
To Kill a Mockingbird
Ghost
American Beauty
The Matrix
Sin City
The Butterfly Effect
Fight Club
Requiem for a Dream
Edward Scissorhands
Monsters Inc. (^.^ yeah it's animation but it's so sweet)

i suggest everyone watches that, its brilliant, and i cry every tme,

i took my son to watch

Ink Master the other night and we loved it, it was funny and brilliant
 
Willow

Excalibur

Fantasia

Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within

Pinocchio

Metropolis

Dumbo

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Harvey

Judgment at Nuremberg

Inherit the Wind

Bonnie and Clyde

Rain Man

A Bug's Life

Clash Of The Titans

Kramer vs. Kramer

Stand by Me

Hud

Gran Prix

Ride the High Country

It Happened One Night

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Strangers on a Train

City Lights

Mutiny on the Bounty

Sergeant York

No Direction Home: Bob Dylan

Patton

Papillon

Finding Neverland

The Invisible Man

The Exterminating Angel

Akira Kurosawa's Dreams

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
 
When You Comin' Back, Red Ryder?

The setting is Foster's Diner, a New Mexico rest stop that lost most of its clientele when a new highway bypass opened. Employees include restless cook Stephen, nicknamed Red Ryder, mousy waitress Angel, and their no-nonsense boss Clark. Lyle, owner of the adjacent filling station, stops in on occasion to break the monotony with his cheery banter. The boring routine of the daily grind is disrupted with the arrival of two couples, the upscale Richard and Clarisse, and the younger and wilder Teddy, an unbalanced Vietnam War vet, and Cheryl, his hippie girlfriend. Complications arise when illegal drugs and guns enter the picture, and Teddy resorts to physical, mental, and emotional torture when he holds everyone hostage.
 
Whale Rider

Whale_Rider_movie_poster.jpg
 
Some of my favorites:

Starship Troopers

Dizzy: My mother always told me that violence doesn't solve anything.
Jean Rasczak: Really? I wonder what the city founders of Hiroshima would have to say about that.
[to Carmen]
Jean Rasczak: You.
Carmen: They wouldn't say anything. Hiroshima was destroyed.
Jean Rasczak: Correct. Violence has resolved more conflicts than anything else. The contrary opinion that violence doesn't solve anything is merely wishful thinking at its worst.

Ride with the Devil.

Daniel Holt: You supposed to sleep with the wife, Roedel. Great day in the mornin' you got to know that much! You supposed to share her bed. That way, if some other man do that, you shoot him.

The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Senator: The war's over. Our side won the war. Now we must busy ourselves winning the peace. And Fletcher, there's an old saying: To the victors belong the spoils.
Fletcher: There's another old saying, Senator: Don't piss down my back and tell me it's raining.

Unforgiven.

Little Bill Daggett: I don't deserve this... to die like this. I was building a house.
Will Munny: Deserve's got nothin' to do with it.
[aims gun]
Little Bill Daggett: I'll see you in hell, William Munny.
Will Munny: Yeah.
[fires]

Go Tell It to the Spartans.

Maj. Asa Barker: Never in the U.S. have we asked for anything back. It would screw up the bookkeeping.


Second Hand Lions.

Hub: [to Stan] You're lucky the lion got to you before *we* did.

Brigadoon.

Mr. Lundie: They were indeed horrible destructive women. I dinna suppose you have such women in your country?
Tommy Albright: Witches?
Jeff Douglas: Oh we have 'em. We pronounce it differently.

Ailens, the first one.

Hudson: Hey Vasquez, have you ever been mistaken for a man?

Vasquez: No, have you?

Batteries Not Included.

Faye Riley: Frank! It's the love boat to Cuba! Shuffle board and pineapples filled with rum. Know what they do? They put little paper umbrellas sticking out the top so that when it rains, it don't thin out the liquor.

Quigley Down Under

Major Ashley-Pitt: In our experience, Americans are uncouth misfits who should be run out of their own barbaric country.
Matthew Quigley: Well, Lieutenant...
Major Ashley-Pitt: Major.
Matthew Quigley: Major. We already run the misfits outta our country. We sent 'em back to England.
 
The Gods Must Be Crazy

I liked that one.


Steyn: What do you know about women?
Mpudi: I got seven wives, how many you got?
Steyn: Why aren't you home with your seven wives?
Mpudi: I know how to marry them. Nobody knows how to live with them.

Narrator: That morning, he saw the ugliest person he'd ever come across. She was as pale as something that had crawled out of a rotting log; her hair was quite gruesome, long and stringy and white, as if she was very old; she was very big - he'd have to take the whole day to find enough food to feed her.
 
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