Why is proton 1837 times heavier than electron?

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Because the kinetic energy of the three quarks, and the gluons that bind them together, give it that much mass in accordance with E=mc^2.

(Source: Wikipedia.)
 
Because the kinetic energy of the three quarks, and the gluons that bind them together, give it that much mass in accordance with E=mc^2.

(Source: Wikipedia.)

thanks!

what kinetic energy of the quarks? are they moving? how many gluons in there? how gluons bind them together?

every 1 can quote wiki, what's the mechanism and detail?
 
Yes, they're moving. Every particle in the Universe moves, it's what we refer to as temperature.

At absolute zero, all subatomic movement stops completely. However, that's a physical impossibility, so absolute zero can never be achieved.

What's wrong with quoting wiki?
 
Yes, they're moving. Every particle in the Universe moves, it's what we refer to as temperature.

At absolute zero, all subatomic movement stops completely. However, that's a physical impossibility, so absolute zero can never be achieved.

What's wrong with quoting wiki?
You know he is just trolling, there is no answer that will satisfy him. Don't feed the troll...
 
Yes, they're moving. Every particle in the Universe moves, it's what we refer to as temperature.

At absolute zero, all subatomic movement stops completely. However, that's a physical impossibility, so absolute zero can never be achieved.

What's wrong with quoting wiki?

so quarks move in nucleus? circling or vibrating? what's the mechanism? how gluons bind them together? wiki has no details. do you?
 
I don't know. Nobody knows. Science over that last hundred years was done by pulling random words out of a hat and throwing darts at them. You've discovered science's greatest secret. Congratulations, you can now become part of our global conspiracy to make up science and pretend it's real. Your welcome pack will be sent telepathically to you within 6-8 weeks.
 
Yes, they're moving. Every particle in the Universe moves, it's what we refer to as temperature.

At absolute zero, all subatomic movement stops completely. However, that's a physical impossibility, so absolute zero can never be achieved.

What's wrong with quoting wiki?
Generally wiki is pretty good for discussions like we have. It's not appropriate to reference wiki for scientific literature or school work.
 
At absolute zero, all subatomic movement stops completely.

probably not cos then you'd be able to define both momentum and position accurately. or so i have been led to believe.
 
probably not cos then you'd be able to define both momentum and position accurately. or so i have been led to believe.
Same here. I believe it's impossible due to quantum movement called zero-point energy, but I'm not familiar with the finer details of the theory.
 
fair to say no one knows the real answer?

i have a theory, can i share it with you?
 
not you, you will think i am trolling.

serious truth seekers please check out my science ideas/theories about light, gravity, atomic structure at fuckedscience.com.
 
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