Word of the Day. Post it Here

If you are able to get your “invented” words published, we should be able to list them here.

I could see “peepslatch” catching on. ;)
Douglas Adams published his, in "The Meaning of Liff" .

One of those I do in fact use from time to time is a kingston bagpuize, for denoting an overweight and unfit, middle-aged, male jogger.

All the words in that book are repurposed place names:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_Bagpuize
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaplode_Drove

I also quite like pott shrigley, which is a term for the week-old remains of a casserole or stew, eaten cold at 2 a.m. when very drunk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pott_Shrigley
 
Douglas Adams published his, in "The Meaning of Liff" .

One of those I do in fact use from time to time is a kingston bagpuize, for denoting an overweight and unfit, middle-aged, male jogger.

All the words in that book are repurposed place names:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingston_Bagpuize
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whaplode_Drove

I also quite like pott shrigley, which is a term for the week-old remains of a casserole or stew, eaten cold at 2 a.m. when very drunk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pott_Shrigley

Pott Shrigley. That would be the perfect name for an Irish pub that serves shepherd’s pie. Freshly made, though. ;)
 
The story of a polymer.

This is not a story in the linguistic sense, but this self-writing story has a beginning, a middle and a definitive ending, and it is beautiful.
 
Satire: A Form of Art
Satire is a form of art that uses humor, exaggeration, or irony to expose and mock human vices, follies, or abuses.

Example - ''If a tree falls in the forest and no one posts about it on Instagram, does it make a sound?''
 
Can anyone think of a word or expression that is like "faint praise" but would actually describe praise from a person whose opinion you hold in less than maximal esteem?

They might give you fulsome praise (fulsome in the abundant sense) but you would be disappointed in that it counted not so much for you.
 
Presumptuous?
No ,the expression I am looking for is the feeling of the person receiving the praise but who feels disatisfied because the person who is giving the praise is not ,in his own view sufficiently qualified to give that praise .

It is like it is hollow praise even though it is well intentioned and sincere.

Suppose some terrific snob (maybe a top chef-the kind you might find in a Monty Python skit) were to be hosting a dinner party and one of the other diners was a Peter Sellers kind of an idiot sage and made the comment that the coffee was absolutely fabulous "did you get it in Tescos?" when it was some recherché brand of fine coffee bean from Sicily with a soupçon of Himalaya.

How does the recipient of that "beneath him" praise feel?

It is not "faint praise" .The giver of the praise really loves Tescos own brand instant coffee and admires the man's taste in selecting it.

The receiver of the praise thinks he deserves praise for his choice of coffee but he is being praised for the wrong thing.

He is not angry at being inappropriately praised but he is confused at the misunderstanding and maybe wishes he could have been praised for the actual thing he felt he deserved praise for.

Is there a phrase that describes his predicament?
 
No ,the expression I am looking for is the feeling of the person receiving the praise but who feels disatisfied because the person who is giving the praise is not ,in his own view sufficiently qualified to give that praise .
Yes, in the eyes of the person receiving the praise, the person giving the praise is being presumptuous for feeling qualified to give that praise.
 
Yes, in the eyes of the person receiving the praise, the person giving the praise is being presumptuous for feeling qualified to give that praise.
So "presumptuous praise"?

But what about the feeling of liking the praise but feeling it is unsatisfactory.

Everything is perfect but there is a little something that is missing....

"I deserve to be praised but this does not feel quite right...."

"I want to keep this praise but is it really what it seems?"

There is no judgement of the praise giver.

"Presumptuous " does make that judgement ("how dare you praise me with fake praise"-it is not that.It is more regret than a sense of entitlement)
 
To irk (=to annoy or to pain)

Sarkus wrote in a recent post

"I do irk at the idea a government can claim they have massive support for their agenda based on a majority of seats when in reality a majority of people didn't vote for them."The waThe way he hs

It strikes me as a wrong usage.I only know the usage as shown in the various dictionaries online (and cannot find Sarkus' usage in the official" dictionaries -unless I didn't look hard enough)

eg https://www.merriam-webster.com/sentences/irk

Basically "it irks me" or "I am irked" and not "I irk at" **

When I search online ,yes others also use this expression but it feels wrong to me and that they ate all making the same "mistake"

I know Sarkus knows his stuff when it comes to this sort of thing
Does he think it is right?

I think there is another verb that could replace "irk" in the expression "I irk at" .It is on the tip of my tongue but I can't spit it out.

**ie "to irk" would be a transitive verb rather than intransitive.
 
You know how a person who always wears glasses looks when they take their glasses off? They look funny. And there's no words to describe that look. I certainly can't think of any. I'll make up a word now. They look "loofy".
 
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