A photonic clock

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by Quantum Quack, Sep 21, 2004.

  1. Pete It's not rocket surgery Registered Senior Member

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    Yes, that's the whole point. As far as the box is concerned, the box is not moving.

    That makes no sense. To the box, its time is not dilated.
     
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  3. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

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    If you were traveling with this box, I suppose you'd assume that your tick rate was undilated even though you had the intelligence to know otherwise?
     
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  5. Pete It's not rocket surgery Registered Senior Member

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    The whole point of relativity is that "traveling" is relative.
    The box (or any one with it) is entitled to consider it stationary.

    In the box frame, the box is stationary, and its time is not dilated.

    You appear to be assuming that the box is moving in some absolute way?
     
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  7. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

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    no Pete, I understand the relative nature of velocity and I think it's rather clever too, I might add.

    However I am thinking of the box in terms of it's over all reality, in that the box is tarvelling from a to b at a certain velocity relative to any given object other than the box.

    Possibly I am assuming an absolute rest frame which implies any velocity beyond that rest frame meaning every object universally is in some way at velocity relative to that rest frame.

    I understand that velocities are relative.

    When we declare 'c' as 299792kms per sec. what frame is being referenced?

    I would assume Earths' frame to be the answer
     
  8. Pete It's not rocket surgery Registered Senior Member

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    10,167
    How is that more real than that a and b are travelling at a certain velocity, and the box is stationary?

    Or that both the box and a and b are all moving, with the box at a different speed to a and b?

    I think so.

    Any frame. In any frame of reference in uniform motion, the speed of light is c.
     

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