Help with English

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Saint, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. RainbowSingularity Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    774
    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/con-#Etymology_1

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pre#Etymology_1

    is a car a motor bike ?
    yes no it is not is

    as dave says, it depends.

    you ask "can you provide me with (travel) 'serve' ?
    i say yes
    you may borrow my fighter jet because it travels far quickly.
    you say
    i want to travel cheaply
    so i give you my skateboard but you have to travel 5,000 miles.

    the relationship of the usage is scientifc as equally to the application of the interpreted meaning which is subjective in pronoun of collective culture.

    this is one simple reason why Artificial intelligence is a long way off.
     
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  3. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    Like that babble salad will help someone learn English. Good job.
     
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  5. RainbowSingularity Registered Senior Member

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    774
    having a cry in a thread for being caught red handed as a troll in another thread is not very attractive.

    you trying to build a little gang ?
     
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  7. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    Here's an English word for you, asshole: Cretin.

    But I seriously doubt your condition is rooted in endocrine problems.
     
  8. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    8,779
    He's not the first, and its not necessarily a bad thing.

    Many here are pretty certain the OP is a bot, or at least someone teaching a bot.

    I don't have a problem lousing up someone's plans for the AI takeover.
     
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  9. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    31,255
    There's a subtle distinction, which many English speakers don't know.

    Usually when we "compare with", the implication is that the things being compared are broadly similar to one another to start with, whereas when we "compare to" the assumption is usually that the things being compared are different from one another in some important way.

    For example, guerilla warefare in Iraq could be compared with guerilla warfare in Syria. But guerilla warfare has a different character when compared to warfare conducted via a bombing campaign.

    The Oxford English dictionary quotes Shakespeare's sonnet: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" The lover this is addressed to is found to be "more lovely and more temperate", that is, quite different from a summer's day in an important way.

    On the other hand, when we compare the Australian separation of powers with the separation of powers in the United States, we find a lot of similarities (in part because the Australian Constitution was modelled in part on the US Constitution), but note that in Australia there is less separation between the executive and legislative branches of government.
     
  10. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    And even those of us who talk English good can learn something.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  11. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    I always understood the distinction to be that you would use "compared with" when you were intending to highlight the similarities, and "compared to" when intending to highlight the differences.
    Not sure that's necessarily correct, though.
     
  12. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    31,255
    That sounds right to me.
     

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