Inertia and Relativity

Discussion in 'Alternative Theories' started by hansda, Dec 22, 2017.

  1. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    It is better, not to daydream but from my equations, this correlation can be observed.
     
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  3. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    See, our earth is spinning on its axis. This angular speed can be increased. But this angular speed has a limit. This limit,(like speed limit c) can be considered as \(w_c \)

    Through math all hidden truth or invisible truth can be known.
     
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  5. arfa brane call me arf Valued Senior Member

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    The electron has a mass, what's the radius? What about an electron in a hydrogen atom (i.e. bound to a proton)? Does it have a moment of inertia?

    Or is the moment of inertia restricted to classical rigid objects with a known geometry? (I think so)
     
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  7. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    And I'm saying, seriously, if you have managed to reconcile relativity and quantum mechanics, you have accomplished what the entire scientific community has been unable to accomplish in a half century.

    Sci-fo is peanuts. Take your work to a university. They will shower accolades upon you and introduce you to Hawking. Why are you wasting your time here?
     
  8. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Electron do have a radius. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_electron_radius

    Every massive, spinning particle should have a moment of Inertia.

    Conservation of angular momentum is also true for quantum particles. It is universal. http://www.idc-online.com/technical...eering/Quantum_Mechanics_Angular_Momentum.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  9. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Thanks for your suggestions.
     
  10. arfa brane call me arf Valued Senior Member

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    In which case, every massive spinning particle should have a geometry.
    But "should have" and "does have" aren't the same thing.

    What experimental evidence is there for electron geometry?
     
  11. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Did you read that before posting?

    "The classical electron radius is a combination of fundamental physical quantities that define a length scale for problems involving electrons interacting with electromagnetic radiation. According to modern understanding, the electron is a point particle with a point charge and no spatial extent. Attempts to model the electron as a non-point particle are considered ill-conceived and counter-pedagogic."

    i.e. its charge can be used to produce a usable radius when interacting electromagnetically, but the electron is a point particle.
     
  12. hansda Valued Senior Member

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  13. arfa brane call me arf Valued Senior Member

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    Here's a question: if the electron has a fixed radius but is also rotating, it must be that it has a fixed axis of rotation.
    Then why is the electric field of an electron not rotating about a fixed axis, since if it were, a collection of lots of electrons, say in a metal plate, would not have a definite electric field perpendicular to the plate--the field lines would point in all directions and also rotate in space. Why isn't that observed? IOW, why does a charged plate have the field lines all aligned in the same direction if all the electrons are rotating about an axis?

    P.S. I note the first link you have in the previous post is from alternativephysics.org, there the author repeats the mistake of equating \( mc^2 \) and \( hf \), with no explanation.

    Another question: if the electron does have a radius and is like a small sphere, why does it also have a wavelength?
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2018
  14. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Detail structure of an electron is not yet known. In my understanding, it must be hollow at the center, because spinning electron has a magnetic moment. Do you think, the Sun is static or spinning. Electrical field of electrons are spherical like the Sun.
     
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    It is known.
    They have no internal structure, no extra or hidden properties. They can't, or they would not behave as observed.
     
  16. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    These are your own views or you have a supporting source for your views. Anyway, what you think about electron radius. It has a zero radius or non-zero radius?
     
  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    It is part of The Standard Model of Particle Physics. So, essentially, my source is the scientific community.
     
  18. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Does the Standard Model say electron has zero radius?
     
  19. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Don't you think - considering the prolificity of your ideas on physics - that's something you should already know? (There's a teachable moment here.)
     
  20. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Electron has a non zero mass. If it is having zero radius; that means it will have a zero volume. In that case, it would have been a case of singularity.
     
  21. arfa brane call me arf Valued Senior Member

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    One way to overcome that is to consider the mass of the electron as being "somewhere" in a wavepacket. Which is to say, electrons (their charge, mass and spin) have the same probability of being anywhere within a localised region Δx, which defines the boundaries of wavepackets.

    The boundaries depend on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, of course (although that wasn't well understood at first).
     
  22. hansda Valued Senior Member

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    Your \(\Delta x \) symbolises non-zero space. This implies that electron has a non-zero radius.

    Further, if you consider my equation of mass at post #14; it can be observed that as mass increases, its radius decreases. It can be checked that radius of electron is more than radius of proton.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2018
  23. NotEinstein Valued Senior Member

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    Source please.
     

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