Is Gravity Faster than Light?

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by Bowser, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    4,686
    Me too.
    You could be right...about the night mares.
    And clearly you are wrong about being the smartest as there are at least six people here each smarter than each other.
    Well I look forward to it just dont hold back because you are smart but at least try to educate the dull and uninformed ...I am dull and uninformed so I no doubt will be your first fan here.
    Alex
     
    amber likes this.
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  3. amber Registered Member

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    The being smarter than everyone was just a little joke. I thank you for you kind and warm welcome.
     
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  5. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Oh I find that just so disappointing.

    I thought you were being serious.

    I was going to let you discover all by yourself that it is indeed me who is smarter than everyone else as evidenced by the fact I am always right...and that is not a joke I am absolutely serious and that comes from being perfect in most things and above average in areas that I have not studied.
    If there is anything you need to know just ask and if I feel you are worthy I will show you how to find the answers.
    I dont believe in luck but heck it sure is your lucky day.
    Alex
     
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  7. amber Registered Member

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    Well! The sun only shines at the right time, maybe it is not the right time for me to ''show'' off. I am new here after all.
     
  8. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    4,686
    The Sun shines all the time so any times must be the right time.
    The fact that you are new here is good show off whilst everyone are trying to work you out.
    Alex
     
    amber likes this.
  9. amber Registered Member

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    323
    Ok, enter my light thread at your own peril lol .
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    It's a far from stupid question. Gravitational waves have recently been detected and they do move at the speed of light.

    But gravity itself, i.e. a gravitational field, is in principle a static thing, just as an electric field is, if it is not of the oscillating type one finds in EM radiation.

    All this is in fact discussed earlier in the thread.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  11. amber Registered Member

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    323
    A gravitational field moves with the gravitational body, gravitational fields can fluctuate hence LIGO detection. A fluctuation travelling through a field is not the same as the field having a velocity, like I said a stupid question.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    ......[click]....
     
  13. amber Registered Member

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    Terrible reply, meaningless.
     
  14. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    It means he put you on ignore, just like he put theorist--constant on ignore.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  15. amber Registered Member

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    That is their choice and I respect there decision to ignore rather than playing the ban card. It is their personal choice after all.
     
  16. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    I honestly didn't know. The only stupid question is the one you don't ask.
     
    ajanta likes this.
  17. youreyes amorphous ocean Valued Senior Member

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    Basically agree with your statement. Gravity travels at speed of light
     
  18. nebel Valued Senior Member

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    Right. Bodies always carry their gravitational "field " with them. Take the last solar eclipse, August 21. The Sun was up there at 10 o' clock*.( Madras OR time), with its fixed G field, in due time, as predicted, the Moon joined it, her? him? coming from top right, and then finally the sunlight was interrupted, cut off, and the last beam photon reached us ~ one second later, but gravity was there already. An uplifting experience, but not because the gravity tidal effect pulling skyward.
    * ww2 bomber speak would have been "4 o'clock high" facing north. . (ESE)
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2018
  19. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    If gravitational massive objects cannot travel faster than light, how then could it's gravitational field?

    However I have never heard that an object's gravitational field "follows" it's host, but always "accompanies it".
     
  20. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    What is that supposed to mean?
     
  21. nebel Valued Senior Member

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    It meant, that while the eclipse is an interruption of either a stream of particles, or light waves that travel at c, and that interruption was noticed only 1.3 seconds later, after it happened, the alignment, addition of the already existing gravitational fields of Sun and Moon had no such time delay. even then, the radii of the the fields of the sun and moon are so great, the circumferences so "flat" it defies our methods to measure the moment of the gravities max strengths at alignment.
    At the end of totality, the appearance of the "diamond ring" at the top right corner was seen 1.3 seconds later that it started too. Photons streaming past the Moon again, a sliver of a shaft racing through space.

    light took ~8 minutes to get to the Moon, was stopped at the last second before reaching us, leave us in the shadow. Gravity added up smoothly, when Sun, Moon aligned. lifting us up. a little.

    Now, if there were gravitons travelling at c ,---
     
  22. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    About "gravitons". If such a thing exists and it naturally travels @ c, would
    it take longer to traverse a "stretched" space in a gravity field, than if no gravity field were present.

    If so, would this account for the gravitational effect itself?
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2018
  23. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,003
    These are incompatible models.

    It's like asking if photons would take longer to travel through a brightly lit room.
     

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